Skip to main content

Full text of "The Chieftain"

See other formats


■■ 



$ 



JO 



BBS 



MSB 



m 



it\ 



m 



DM 



ffi 



■HH 






na 



MH>. 



Si 



mm 



■ 

MB 

Jafl 



■■ 



KOI 



BC 



s&i 



ran 






ra 



BK1 



Mm 



m 



■ •' i 



■ ■ 



■ rai 



■■ 



msm 



■■■ 



B 






SSbI 







QirO 



m 












*S -1- 



■1 



■■ 



.« 



» Wfc 



■■ 



JS 

hQ HI 



on 



iisi 



M 



HK 



Bin mam 



KkIBmh 



HfflO 



raw 



BS« 



iMnnwn 



Em 



Hsffl 



ran 

H9B 



f/f/i 












■ 



,..i;.;-,/0^f : ;.',.i V ' 



■ 



" ft 




1 



•••'•■ 



FISKE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 5899 00108 8677 








wKR 




hh|b 






ut 


■ 




'vT^ . 












^9$Bi 




I^^H Ml 




■ 




■ 1 

99 




Be Rh 


1 


Hhb 






INK 



i .-, • i 



Sal 

■J j ■■ 

If SH 

g ■ 

' j Hi 



■ i 



•:**..-. 



KJaff 



n 


til 




E^Aj 


ffii 


1 


■ 






Ss 


1 


■ 


ntt 


m 






ntHk 


. * T- 


!^v3 


IflE 


■ 1 t ■ 



mh 




*V I 



K 




■ 



I 



Table Of Contents 

Happenings 

The series of events which take place through out the 
school year are a major part of the student's social life. 

Live And Learn 

As children, we looked forward to its beginnings; as 
youths we were eager for its end; as adults we know our 
education will continue through out the rest of our lives. 
This section remembers those who have helped to shape 

our future . 

People 

These are the students who keep King Philip constantly 
changing through their new and different ideas . 

Togetherness 

The unity and cooperation between students , through 
athletics and clubs , are reflected in their mutual respect 

and support. 

Forum 

The reality of life inside and outside of K.P. is here 
represented in advertisements and human interest 

stories . 



r 



>mi 




£71 




•$> mnj 






The 




Brara 




Staff 

Editor-in-Chief 

Greg Tyo 

Copy Editor 

John Bernard 

Business Manager 

Lisa Boyden 
Section Editors 
John Bernard 

Forum 

Gerard Dumas 

Togetherness 

Ann-Marie Lambert 

Live And Learn 

Paula Trahan 

People 

Kent Van Voorhis 

Happenings 
Photography Editor 

Shirley Uhl 

Layout And Design Editor 

Tom Del Signore I 

Advisor 

Kathryn Podgers 

Business Advisor 

Mrs. Sussan 



Volume XX 







- ■ ^p 



■ 



*mm 






^^m 




V-'-vi'?..' 


1 
■ 


is 


1 ' / v'.' 

1 


S3 


< ^M 


^M 


■ 


m 

■ 


Si 


^■■i 


"*v* 


H 


1 w 










I^^HI 




Sw 




mKoRp 



■ » „ ■■ 

HE 






■h 

18 



jVJI 



** 



,*- ■ .,, - ■.,- •#• 



W 



'■ 

















^D 



future is always dependent upon the past. 

In this book, we bring you this year's past 
to be remembered in the future. 





■ 



■ 



■ 












I H ■ *, 






HI 



■ ■ 

■ • v 



■ 






". . . But even more important, we've established 
a sense of class spirit and unity." 



Clark Kinlin 














VJL 



1 






<0 






ft 







I 




J 




•< 







? t> 



Mra 



'<-\- 



■ • 



I 

BOB 



■ s 



* •- 



KJB 





BUS m in fi^fl 

■■:■•'■■■ 



Mm 






/\DOVC *• OTG JL1I6 SxZ£ 

sophomore float a 
showing of long 
hours and 
dedications. The 
workmanship shows 
through. 

Left- the freshman 
float, a good try for 
the first time . 






■ 






,*.: 



^m 



■ 



■^^H 



MM ■■ 







Bra 



m 






^^ M ^J rior to our victorious homecoming game, K. P. students 
f^^ psyched up by participating in a "spirit week. " 
JL The week was kicked off with a dance on Saturday, 

Oct. 2. The old gym shook to the sounds of "Thundertrain" and the 
week's festivities had begun. On Monday we indulged in grubbiness 
as we attired ourselves in the raunchiest clothes in our 
possession . . . strange thing - some of us didn't look any different 
from other days. Tuesday was class color day. Seniors clad in 
brown, Juniors in red, Sophomores in blue, and Freshmen in yellow. 
A prize was awarded to the Sophs for their radiating light blue appearance. 
Wednesday might have been Prince Spaghetti day in the North End, but at King 
Philip it was tag- day where the guys could not speak to the girls without 
forfeiting their name tags. The so-called "stronger sex" proved their weak- 
ness by either breaking down and talking or cheating. Freshman Cindy Geib 
received a K. P. hat for being the biggest flirt. Thursday found us wearing 
bizarre hats of all 
shapes, colors, and 
sizes. Senior Skip 
Workman and Sophomore 
Laura Hanlon each won 
prizes for being the 
strangest looking of 
the day. Green and 
Gold day concluded 
"spirit week" with 
everyone donning the 
school colors. 
Finishing the day was 
a pep rally in which 
the Junior- Sophomore 
team out- shouted the 
Senior- Freshman duo 
in a competition 
cheer. Homecoming 
queen, Andrea Colletto 
and her court Karen 
Rubel, Doris Kohut, 
and Paula Sciaba were 
presented with 
bouquets. The grand 
finale came on the 
gride ron when the 
fighting Warriors out- 
battledthe O.A. 
Tigers to victory. 




* 



a i ( 




Mwan 










- 


HRHH 


i 
i 


H-! I 1' 


■ 


■H 


i 


m 


« . 



,*" . 





feel Rs 




IS 

Bra #?1 




p**> 






r, 



■ 



M 



Sit 




^ 










America's Bicentennial 
was celebrated at K. P. in 
June '76 through the 
production and 
performance of the award- 
winning musical, 1776! 

The play, staged by the 
King's Players: a group of 
students , faculty and 
members of the 
community, under the 
direction of Ms . Suzanne 
Person, traced the events 
leading up to the signing of 
the Declaration of 
Independence . 





m 





















j 

L 






■ 


v_ 


) 




I I 










f 




Several King Philip students were 
chosen for different roles in the 
presentation. Teaming with 
Richard Shepardson and Chris 
Less who turned in stupendous 
performances was: Cookie 
Bussanti, who was one of few 
women in the show as the wife of 
Thomas Jefferson, Seth Tzizik, 
playing the part of Richard Henry 
Lee; the boisteous, spirited 
delegate from Virginia. Rick 


1 


L^^^^^fcj 


Schnorbus , who portrayed George 
Read; the little squeeky delegate 
from Delaware. Also, 
Representing Delaware was Col. 
Thomas McKean; the tall gun- 
weilding Irishman played by Liam 
McBrien. The stuffy delegate from 









Maryland was characterized by Randy 
Blood. Scott Butler played Charles 
Thomson Congressional secretary; and 
Congressional custodian, Andrew McNair 
and his assistant who portrayed by Kent 
Powderly and Melanie Belcher . Rounding 
out the K.P. represented cast was 
Michael Lyons as the courier . Behind the 
scenes of "1776" were several hard 
workers from K.P. , among them were: 
Ann-Marie Lambert, Bernadette and 
Darlene Lawrence , Carol and Pat Costa 
and Kate Less. Melinda Carneho and 
Mark Neal helped out musically during the 
show. 

The long hard road of practices was 
rewarded with three fine performances 
where everyone turned in super jobs and 
were awarded with thunderous applause 
each time. 




Mr 



Rf 



ui 



■ 



t 
I : 



f 









For a visitor 
[gazing through 
King Philip 
classrooms on 
Greaser Day 
1976 many- 
peculiar 
sights could be seen. For instance to the left, who's that 
cool cat? Could it be John Bernard? We think so. Or what 
about that sinister creature to the right is he a notorious 
gangster from the 50* s or really the school librarian Mr. 
Fortunato? What of these five characters below? "HELLS 
ANGELS"? . . . or on second thought . . . 



JUL 



II 






r — . 



■HE 




'5*« 



Some of K.P.'s 
senior citizens 
could have 
sworn that it 
was bikie con- 
vention time in 
1956, but those 
poor souls were 
sadly deluded. 

No, it was sim- 
ply greaser day 
1976 when the 
usual casual 
looking King 
Philip students 
outfitted their 
bods in the 
paraphenelia of the chain swing- 
ing, gum snapping style of the 

fifties . 



KEY 

IAN. 

CLUB? 




KU 



«;• 







Time To Remember 



Magical and enchanting are two adjectives that could describe a 

Prom night. Everyone is dressed elegantly and probably better than 

ever before . Costly is still one more adjective that can describe 

and sometimes dampen this ' 'magical experience' ' . Costs for 

proms can be astronomical , ranging anywhere from $74 . 00 to 

almost $200.00. It can really play havoc on the high school 

students budget. In terms of cost, anywhere 

from $9. 00- $25. 00 is spent per hour. Of 

course if a prom doesn't seem to be worth 

that much money , there are many other 

things to do with it . For instance ; $74 . 00 

can get you to the movies 37 times or 7,400 pieces of bubble gum, 

or a bean bag chair or a television set. For $200.00 you could buy a 

color T. V. , or a round trip airplane ticket to Texas, or the down 

payment for a diamond ring , or 200 pairs of socks . Of course the 

philosophers will say ' 'Yes' ' , but the 

experience of a prom is worth the money. We 

think this is up to you to decide . What is more 

meaningful to you, a beanbag chair or a prom? 



Sherry Widak, the junior member of the court, gracefully waltzes across the 

ballroom with her escort, Jim Brown. Joe Calzaretta enjoys a fine 

meal, vintage wine, and a romantic evening with his girlfriend. 








.VjV 




o 



A Dill To Forae 



A prom night can be a magical, enchanting experience — 
everyone is dressed quite elegantly, probably looking better 
than they ever have before. Unfortunately, this "magical 
experience " doesn't come for free. Costs for proms can be 
astronomical, ranging anywhere from $74 to almost $200. 
And, even if the girl pays for her part of the dinner and gas, 
the guy foots more than half of the bill. It can really play 
havoc on the average high school student's budget. Below 
is a list of the average range of expenses for a prom. 



GIRLS 

Hairdo $0-$15 

Shoes $0-$20 

Dress $14-$50 Total $14-$85 

GUYS 

Tux (not including shoes) $28-$50 

Shoes $0-$7 

Gas $l-$3 

Corsage $6-$10 

Dinner $20-$30 

After Prom $5-$10 Total $60-$110 

Grand Total $74- $195 






», 



#3/' 



V o VO/ 




In terms of costs, any- 
where from $9-$25 is 
spent per hour. Of 
course, if a prom 
doesn't seem to be 
worth that much 
money, there are 
many other things 
you could do with 
the money. $74 
can get you to 
the movies 37 
times, or 7,400 
pieces of bubble 
gum, or a bean- 
bag chair, or a 
television. For 
$200, you could 
buy a color T.V. , 
or a round-trip 
airplane ticket to 
Texas, or the 
down-payment on 
a diamond ring, or 
200 pair of socks. 
Of course, the phil- 
osophers will say, 
"Yes, but the ex- 
perience of the prom 
is worth the money. " 
We leave it up to 
you. Next year, 
will you go to the 
prom, or buy a 
T.V. ? 



17 




CSo® 




On Monday, Tuesday, and Wed- 
nesday, November 22, 23, and 24, 
K. P. held a Mini-Spirit Week, with 
some of the student body, as well as 
some of the faculty and administra- 
tion, doing bizarre things. For exam- 
ple: on Monday, we experienced 
clash day. People came in dressed in 
the most clashed outfits they would 
find. Tuesday was tag day. Each girl 
received one tag which would be lost 
to the first boy she talked to. The boy 
with the most tags by the end of fifth 
period won a prize. The two winners, 
Ronnie Berry and Ron Sullivan, were 
awarded K. P. hats. On Wednesday, 
the school was a mass of green and 
gold with everyone getting psyched 
up for the pep rally. During the rally, 
Elise DuVarney was crowned Thanks- 
giving Day ueen > as Cyndi Zagie- 
boylo and Sherry Widak joined her as 
court. 

Also, on Monday and Tuesday of 
this Mini-Spirit Week, each class 
made a Spirit Chain. The links to 
this chain each cost 5<t, with the pro- 
ceeds going to the free Christmas 
Dance. At the pep rally, on Wednes- 
day, the chains were measured and 
the senior class won the competition. 

The whole spirit week was a great 
success, especially with the results of 
the Thanksgiving football game. Our 
glorious Warriors reigned victorious 
over the Franklin Panthers with a 
score of 7 to 6. 

At upper right, Pam Bryant exhi- 
bits her spirit in an enthousiastic leap 
for joy. 

At left, Tim Darling participates 
in one of the activities during the pep 
rally. 



ooo 




MBiFfcfl 

SSI 



MB 



s ■ 

WnKi 



ben 



** M 



I 





n 




^ f^rq 



Giving makes you smile, but in 
this case it could make you wince, 
if you're afraid of needles. At this 
school, however, we have many 
"brave souls", as was proven when 
the blood drive came to school for 
the first time last spring. Students 
volunteers aided Red Cross volun- 
teers by taking temperatures, typ- 
ing information cards, and serving 
refresments to those who had just 
given blood. All in all, the drive 
was very profitable, with 119 don- 
ors participating. 

Giving makes you smile . . . 
also makes you hungry, as it did 
the participants in the Bike Hike for 
the Mass. Assoc, for Retarded Ci- 
tizens. There was a cure for the 
"munchies, " however, halfway 
through the hike, tired cyclers 
found a delicious barbecue waiting 
for them, at Plainville Park, pre- 
pared by the members of the Volun - 
teer Service Club. 

The bike hike was a fund rais- 
ing event in which the participants 
were sponsored by their friends and 
families according to the number of 
miles each biker road. Both stu- 
dents and teachers pulled their 
bikes out of the garage, and, rusty 
or not, began the 10 mile trek from 
K. P. High to Plainville Park and 
ended back at K. P. High. 



20 




IRE 





I 




IX, <: 



.■i 



Vht Dintief 



The Super Senior Supper of '76 was a blast for all who attended. Good natured 
pushing and shoving rippled through the cafeteria as the class of '77 gorged them- 
selves on their sumptuous dinner buffet. Santa Claus alias Paul Marcelino, skip- 
ped through collecting kisses under the mistletoe. Rowdy suspense filled the hall 
as Scott Butler, the dinner's colorful/and outstanding emcee announced the super- 
latives. The superlatives, some thrilled, like the class flirt, Sandy Kunz, and 



•'T^r 



W 



SI 



'/ 



\f 



some not so thrilled, like pessimest 
Doug Gross, all took their turns on 
the laps of Santa and Mrs. Claus, 
Mary Casey. Jayne Henderson stood 
in for Alan Urko to collect the class 
couple award with Cyndi Zagieboylo, 
and went on to dance together. In a 
suprise, Clark Kinlin gave his most 
dependable award to Bruce Burkhardt. 
And as a finale, Mr. Keimach pre- 
sented the class with the "English as 
a Foreign Language" award. 



iKINGPH" 



'i^ 



A 


















-ill 
II 

I 
■ Mil 



I 

r 



22 



W 



W* 



The Wtitieff 



1. Clark KinW 
&. CJccck luwJin. 

3. Linc(.cc %pe. 
«h GuruJU ZocieWita 
5, EIjsc DuYarueu 
G. Soxidu VCutu. 
1. Cut\tli ZaoveWxilo 
«, AW UvrWo 
^. Grec. A.eue<" 

}0, Rudlcecc CoUcHro 
ii. Gsucta XacieVx>uW 
)£. Eiiie DuY"(ocx\.tvJ 
13. Gkrk KinW 

J5-. Radlceo. College 
16. hLex^Vojo. VocAvS 
IT. /La.riQ,T\Tit D> lie. 
jfc. Tjnuruj jJa-c\\r\Ci 

£l, Nc«X\G* G)OU)\YA-SKi 



CJo,ss Opfimisj 

'Bed' riOurc 
tlasV SpYfjV 
13esV Overall G. 
Class j-'iiri 
Class Coopk 
Cjass CoopW 

JUsV S>pV*iA 
/L05V CW»c.ecJL 
Jjes^r Lock wo G. 
Aoi^r Si'Udliooi'B, 
/L05V S^ocJUouj G. 
Oes^ ouuoL 
CjcuSs Qocon 
Host Rri. Boy 
H.os<r ftri. GV) 



£3. Goxk KmW /losV ropok* 'Bou 

84- QclTK K»t\.\m. JW LiWelb SoceetL 

2.5. fLcoiawu D\re Aosl JLilceJo Succeed 

-£&. £coH 'BoiUc AosV JypiccJ Goo 

£Z- JVa*k Ccks Cjass CJooon. 



es, J<cvj.t\ i'C'eWe 



3 



njuoaus Laic 



SWiesV Gk) 



£<% Lauren. 'QuVW /tost Tupical Gi^i 

30. Gondii ZaCidWt^o Cjuss Gossip 

31. flnckreu Co\UWo Kos 5 ! %po\c* GM 
32- Carol 'Re.icL 
33. IknAis J1xk<uxAi\ici Cotei 13ou 

3& Doug Gt-06!} CSa.6S Ps&jvyu^ 

3G>. Ga<K K»^\^a Yics[ Dependable 

37. Duvjjcjl 'BJccskc SWsl 13ou 

33. fcl^e. 'D^Yarncu CksS GiQcler 

31. Vbo] JlarceWo Class flirt 



13es^ PecsonaM 



40 . Li sa 1) oraflA 

Au PavicL loias^o loes^r Lookvno 

^g.Sfeoe FiA<\eGui\. oesi D^essccJL 

43. Louis Cuo-me* Giasb Log.^ 



3 



Most Talk- l^ou M- K^^W £\>ax\$ tos^ Chcnc.ecl 



23 







* "..TV ' * 



BEratt 



■ 
(93 

'.•■1 • 



^M 






H 










P\<$&rfa<l*D 









' . 



ON* 






'$&- 



leu 



?t*. 



ajwioiy 



& u 



*> 



£ 



♦ 








The class of 1978 sponsored the 
semi -formal: "Starry Starry 
Night on April 2 from 7:30- 
11:30 at the K. P. Ballroom. 

The Dance began with a buf- 
fet meal of roast chicken 
parts, Swedish meatball, Ri- 
gatoni with sauce and assorted 
side dishes. Soon after the ta- 
bles were cleared, Joe Miconi's l 
Band began to play and everyone | 
got up to dance. The band 
played a great variety of fast 
and slow songs. About halfway 
through the night, couples 
were asked to dance in front of 
Ythe band so that a queen and her 
court could be chosen. The court 
members from the Freshmen 
class were Cindy Cook and Beth 
Petruchik from the Sophomore 
class Diane Melin and Renee 
Watremez. Chosen for queen 
was Denise Field. The dance 
ended around 11:30 and the 
ballroom was soon empty. 
The memories of the even- 
ing, however, will remain 
forever. 








mi 

V 






■ i rt 



!MWII 



m 



■ 

■ 

I 
US' 



1 1 KU 

■■ 

DOB! 

Hi 



■ 
■ 




■a 



S3 

■ ■ 
■1 

■ I HE 
BHA 



■a 
■ ' ■ 



1 

it PmBM 



R* 



■OB 



■ 




L%SH 



8K 







?,v- 




A3 



]MM&3tefc 






* '■ ' W 



i ■ »rJ 



m 



ill 



-*•* 



THE JUNIOD 



BL'-ffc" si 



The Class of 78 Flea Market was 
held on May 15, 1976 on the foot- 
ball field. This was just one of the 
many fund-raising activities which 
the sophomores organized. Other 
school -related groups such as Stu- 
dent Council, the Freshman Class 
Council, the Cheerleaders, and the 



.JfJBflS 



O 



rm 



Outdoors Club supported the sopho- 
more class by renting tables. Baked 
goods, plants, white elephant items, 
handmade crafts, food, and even 
pony rides were sold or at least 
offered for sale. There was also a 
Car Wash in which as many people as 
cars got wet. 



mm 



***?% 



9>C&S. KtrtO.,}^ 



ft 



.HUNDREM 



30 









fcc&v. fiewe 



CLAM of K. 





The Sophomore CI ass- sponsored Chic 
n Barbeque was held on June 12, 1976. 
For a reasonable price, patrons were 
given one-quarter of a barbequed chic- 

n with stuffing, rolls, salad with dres- 
sing, their choice of beverages, and a 
choice of a wide variety of homemade 
desserts, ranging from cakes to cookies 
brownies. Senior citizens were given 



a reduced price rate. Residents from 
various area nursing homes, including 
the Sheldonville Nursing Home and Ser 
enity Hill, attended and were very sat- 
isfied with their meals. Hotdogs were 
also served and people were given the 
chance to buy side orders of the va- 
rious foods. Everyone who came went 
away happy and full. 



f -cojJ f o-rcX. 



DOLLARS 




■ 



I 

1 1 




32 



On December 16, 1976 » DECA held 
Mm a very successful combination 
M fashion/talent show. In the first 
part of the program fashions from the 
Franklin Mill Store Teen Fashion Council were 
modeled t The elegant ladies who modeled the 
wardrobe were Lorraine McKinnon, Bernadette Law- 
rence , Leslie Swallow and Mary Ellen Cornell. The 
charming Diane WaitJtevich emceeded the show. 



PRESENTS 




The talent part of the program 
was introduced by the one and only 
Steve Galvin, who was the master of cere- 
monies. Many talented students participated 
in the show. Winners from King Philip were 
Laurie Fisher, taldng second place for singing that 
beloved song ' 'Country Roads 1 * and Linda McCracken taking 
third place for soloing on the piano. The first place 
winner was a young man from Franklin , who performed a magic act 



LN 




M'liss Calsiretta 



3 e , 




foo 



n»r 




'inski 8. 






i ^ i cm 




^^MpjJ , « ^HII 




i-^^^K ^ B 1 


1 vln 






H^HIL^H c V^H 




^3f|&l 



Aubrey Steinbau 
Blocks. 









Craig Starkey will major in cheerleading 
and coordination next year, and 
Bob Stock will be next year's 
varsity cheerleading coach. The 
girl's coaches also can't be 
forgotten. Greg Meyer led 
his Sophomore -Freshman team 
to victory, and should 
be expecting a position 
of K.P. 's coaching 
staff next year . 



r * , t> 





~ - * * * 



with it. 



Sheik 



ie ball] 



During 

halftime •« 

we had a 
truly FORGET- 
TABLE perform- 
ance by Jim 
Bouche and his 
marching band . 
They gave us a 
rendition of what 
sounded like a passing 
train, but was actually 
an original composition. 



.,.- 




Bob Stoc 



Kg - 










■ 



R8 



1KB 

I 4 I 





1. Mrs. Robbins, 2. Mr. Pelleter, 3. Mrs. Larson and Mrs. Wright, 4. Dr. Grady and Mr. Meyer, 5. Mr. Kelter 
and Mr. Amoling 



School Committee 




38 



A School Committee meeting is a "meeting of many moods. " First, the casual 
hellos in greetings - -talk of family and friends; then it's a down to business atti- 
tude as the meeting starts on its way. But even the atmosphere of business can be 
broken when someone makes a K. P. blooper. But by the end of another long night 
much has been accomplished. 



3 V 




The Administration -The 
people who run the school. 

1. Mr. Hart assistant 
principal "These McDon- 
alds receipts just won't 
pass for official expenses". 

2. Mr. White -Administra- 
tive Assistant" The man 
behind the money". 

3. Mr. Costa superinten- 
dant 

4. Mr. Lavine -Principal 
So these are your plans 

for Senior Day' 

5. Mr. White-Assistant 
Principal "O.K. Tom do 
you have a last request". 

6. Jim Peebles 

7. "Flying High Janice?' 

8. Jimmy Jordan 



A 
d 
m 
i 
n 



s 
t 
r 
a 




^H 







I 

SEBm 

m 



■ 




^H 



■VA'a 



. H ■ 










Secretaries 

1. Mrs. Franklin-Super's office 

2. Mrs. Kosten-Super's office 

3. Mrs. Maduskie -Super's office 

4. Mrs. Webster-Vocational office 

5. Mrs. Candela-Principal's office 

6. Sue Prevett in Senior Study 

7. R. Stoddart in School Store 

8. Mrs. Franklin, Mrs. Fluck, and 
S. Raymond enjoy the Homecoming 
Day Parade 9. "What's going on?" 




^m 



■ 
IBB 



BBS 



■ 



■ ■ 



^ni 





>* 





v" 1 



7 •- M 






• I 



I 



41 




.wasA 





*f 



/ 



This year one of our secretaries, Mrs. Davis, left our school to go 
out West. Mrs. Davis was the Guidance secretary. 

During her few years here she helped many students with their col- 
lege applications, financial applications, etc. Mrs. Stelzman left 
the main office to be the Guidance secretary. 

Thank you, Mrs. Davis, and 
Good luck, Mrs. Stelzman 



1. T. Kelly listens during a classroom discussion. 2. Mrs. Davis, 
ex -guidance secretary. 3. Mrs. Stelzman. 4. Mrs. Candela--Main 
Office. 5. Mrs. Waldron--Main Office, looks over a Chieftain an- 
nouncement. 6. One of the newest members of the student body. 7. 
^^^^^^^^ K ^ m Not only the secretaries have to do 

paper work --as A. Perry finds out. 









1 

r.'V; • 



rare 



TmM 



W> 1 

I 

3HBUL 

■ 
I raS 



■ 






■ 

■ ■ 

OS 



..w; 



I 

1 
Hi 



lSES 







Mrs. P. Martin, Mrs. M. Wichlund, Mrs. C. Kennedy 
Mrs. E. Discuillo, Mrs. V. Mitchell, Mrs. V. Urm- 
strom Mrs. J. Mucciarone, Mrs. F. Coughlan, Mrs. E. 
Treen 







Ml 



Lunch Time- is a social 
time for students at K. P. , 
its a break between clas- 
ses. Students can go out 
and have a cigarette or 
they can just sit and 
eat. Something new has 
been added to the cafe- 
teria-the A la carte 
line. Students can get 
a third choice to have 
a good meal. 





Trisha Adams 






\ M 


ill 


I 




^ Mrs. Landry 






1 




43 










■Kinivv 





s 



h 



, 




1. Mrs. Daniels, 
cross guard. 

2. Lunch time 
smoking area, 

3. Mrs. Gimache, 
school nurse. 

4. Mrs. Morri- 
sey, cleans up 
executive offices. 

5. Mrs. Fisher, cafeteria 
manager 

6. Football team waits in an- 
ticipation. 

7. Mrs. Schwalbe, "dial a 
prayer". 

8. Mr. Felix, director of 
hall traffic. 



I 




44 



r»\Vt I I I ■ 




Sophomores show spirit 

Mr. Bonney custodian 

Mr. Seed 

Mr. Burke, head custodian, 

and three of his trusty crew; 

L. Ellsworth, N. Lavallee, 

and B. Johnson 

Girls after a rigorous gym 

class. 

A student munches on a 

candy stick 

Mr. Sherlock makes 

another visit to clean up after 

the yearbook staff. 

Juniors at work 



J 

a 

n 

1 

t 

o 

r 

s 






«i 







\* •» i 



m 





B&Eat 

Of 

Wfm 

■ a 



nil 




BD_ 



■ 
■ 

■I 






>*i: 



■ 






1. Mrs. Dire and J. Larkin go 
over some work. 

2. The crowd watches with in- 
tensity. 

3. Mrs. Winteringhorn reads a 
funny page. 

4. Mr. Kasparian "Today's les- 
son is " 

5. P. Marcelino is shown still 
joking around as the dance 
around goes out the door during 
a fire alarm. 

6. Old Segmund himself; Mr. 
Berquist. 

7. Mrs. Hayes contemplates, 
"what next?" 



Do you need informa- 
tion or nelp in choosing 
an interesting career? If 
the answer is yes visit the 
Career Information Cen- 
ter. In the Career Infor- 
mation Center, located 
in K. P. 's Media Center, 
are many different boxes 
lined up on the tables. 
These different boxes are 
called SRA Kits, occupa- 
tional briefs, career files, 
subject related career in- 
formation, and occupa- 
tional boxes. Also in the 
Career Information Cen- 
ter films are shown on 
certain occupations. 




Hi ? - 



46 



■ 



»<> 



* 






1. Helen Brennan and L. Morris go 
over work. 

2. Miss Hansen makes a smart 
move over B. Bonin. 

3. Mr. Rice and his merry men. 

4. D. Brown has B. Clive by the 
nose. 

5. We're number one! 

6. K. Tomes makes a K. P. Spirit 
Chain. 




s 

t 

u 
d 
e 
n 
t 

S 
e 
r 
v 
i 

c 
e 
s 



Cil 



'/ 




r 



-r ( jm_ 



m 






i ■ 



ft 




I t. 



1. Miss Re sea 

2. Miss Ryan 

3. Mr. Young 

4. Mr. Geib, Head of Dept. of Guidance 

5. Mr. Keleher 



The Guidance Dept. is there to help 
all students the best it can. They, the 
counselors, are there to help with sche- 
dule changes, college applications, and 
problems if a student just needs to talk. 














1 


■ 


1 










- 







"•' 




. > 



Guidance 









1. Mr. Sumner, 
Tech. Drawing, tells 
J. Benker to, "Darken 
those lines" 

2. Mr. Kelley. 

3. A student and his 
partially completed 
work. 

4. & 5. More and 
more girls are be- 
coming interested in 
industrial Arts, may- 
be its women's lib 
who Knows? But watch 
out guys here they 
come 



■^■K 




49 



M 



■ Hi •. 
HP9M2 




■ 
■L 

■ 

■ 

■ ' 

*P 



H 



4UaHal 

<•$■:•'< 

UNraKf 

KB'*"- 



■ 



SH 






^ ^ 







: 




35 








1 



31 





36 




_ s^5^ 



<V 



• * 




10 



11 



•. ■ 







><* 



ffltf 



■ 

. ■ * . > 



Mnft 



H^V 



■ ■ 



* • •: , t. 













wsXt 







,'• ' 



nBani. 

■■ mid 



,",> ■ 








Left: Mr. G. Kamon, Right: Mr. I. Cass, 
Center Left: Mr. M. Drisko Center: Mr. J. 
Voci, Center Right: Mr. E. Mangsen 











■ ;s^ 



mm rnncTi 





IT 

JL 




Right: Mr. W. Moore, Left: Mr. 
R. Pierce 





■ ■ 



BfOWi 



■fffc'+BB 






Left: Mr. P. Berteletti, Right: Mr. 
G. Meurling, Below Left: Mr. P. 
Berteletti, Right: Mr. G. Meur- 
ling, Below: Mr. A. Hart 





fe^. wk 




I 1 


f 

f 


£^ 






iriircireiCAiL 







WLM 






■KB 

bhHT 






Wfi 



■ 



I . 



'<v 







IP II @ im fc ^m ©ii(fftit©(fn@(fii€© 





fe 



van 



$Ti- 



£593 



KM 
•«* HUH ■■■ ■ eSk 9wk 




nHutMl 



ar^jifk 






Home Ec. Reveals 
Talent And Creativity 

This year sewing projects ranged from wrap- 
on skirts to coats and vests to jumpsuits. Girls 
learned the basics of sewing by making a project 
of their choice. 



Tina Ricci (Top Left) gets advice from 
Mrs. Pfeffer. (Top Center) Denise Field 
begins to cut while Lisa Kenney (Top Right) 
looks for her next piece. Mrs. Sherlock 
(Left) shows Jeanne Lamb a stitch. (Bottom 
Left) J. Fuery takes a seam out as Mrs. 
Pfeffer looks on. (Bottom Right) A look at 
some of the work behind the finished pro- 
duct (Right). 





■ 





The Way To A Man's 
Heart 

Girls learned to make breaskfast foods, quick 
breads, deserts, soups, cake decorating, and 
PIZZA. Nadine O'Connell (Top Left) experiences 
one of very few mistakes made in cooking. Ellen 
Welsh (Above) grins after a look at some of the 
Christmas cookies made in class. 



Child Care students studied Phyisical and Social Develo 
pment as well as other child developments. Ms. Lahaise 
(Left) talks to parents during open house. Preschooler 
(Right) finds interests in some plastic sticks. Ms. Lahaise 
(Below) talks with Jean Marcure. Miss. Radomski (Cen- 
ter) comes across an article on family living. Debbie 
Zimmer (Bottom Right) reads to preschoolers. 




S.1^ 



>.• ■ 



'»*• 



■^^M 



■ 




n^i* ■? l «,•?!' 



^m 



H 







Media Center 



That all new carpeted pad down by the sup's office is the Media Center. This fantas- 
tic place has everything from books to movies. In addition, it has a psyc-out place cal- 
led the career information center where students can begin to plan their future. 



62 




■B^l ■ 








Mr. Hill directing the band. 



P. Adams enjoying 




The Band 
at work 

Miss. Newell enjoying her 
work 








63 



I 



y.j^x- 



i 




i 




64 





i 

-■ If ^ 




£« 8P\ 


# 






^^7 


ii3 




1 *^ 






7/s^k 






•it '7 7/31 




l^k. Vm 




i< 




. ' ^ 


1 


^r 




1 








■.> 




^r 




Miss 
prop 



demonstrates 









Opp. page 1. Mr. Fink looks over his atten- 
dance records. 2. Mrs. Smith relaxes between 
classes. 3. A sub. , Mr. Donlon throws the ball 
into the air to start the action. . 4. Coach 
Hartley strides toward the game bench to have 
a pre-game conference with the guys. This 
page 1. A unique view of the new universal 
machine. 2. Mrs. Pfeffer puts the ball into 
play. 3. Mr. Dittrich, new athletic co- 
ordinator, makes a speech at the Thanksgiving 
Day pep rally. 4. Mr. Cosentino, athletic 
head, demonstrates to a student the proper 
use of the universal machine. 




65 



■ ■ 



■ ; ■ 







English 



Opp. page 1. Mr. Keimach talks to D. 
Gatie about a composition. 2. Miss South- 
worth oversees one of her students work. 3. 
Mrs. Alter turns to listen to a students ex- 
planation of an event. This page 1. Mr. 
Ahern makes his point clear. 2. Ms. Person 
has a good day. 3. Mrs. Negus, dept. head, 
takes five. 4. Mrs. Sussan closes shop for 
the day. 5. Mr. Besaw enjoys a lemon drop. 
6. you'd be surprised at all the junk .... 







man 




H ""^"V. 



' \ 




opp. page -1. Mrs. Coppell watch- 
es as J. Whitney continues her 
work. 2. M. Gagnon seems to be 
in another world as she listens to a 
class discussion. 3. D. Shanks has 
a good laugh over what she's read- 
ing. 4. Mrs. Bronzetti looks up 
from talking to K. Hoar to smile 
for the camera. This page- 1. Mr. 
Mahoney tries to get a picture on 
the video machine. 2. B. Clinton 
spends a moment of class time in 
thought. 3. M. Neal thumbs 
through a magazine before class. 
4. Mr. Lombard looks over the 
classroom situation. 5. A reflec- 
tion of the lockers appears in the 
window when one is looking in on 
Mr. Black. 6. Mr. Houde smiles 
when asked a question by a student. 






.*,*», 



*•••» 



?•». 






fit 



*»» 



«.. 



£ 





WEI H 



^H 







SLUSH 



' ■ 



BLc 



■■ 



I 



MM 



■ 





No wonder I flunked history-it was be- 
fore my time ! 

--T. Rapoza &J. Rose 
Learning yesterdays mistakes to improve 
the tomorrows. 

1. Surprised by the opened door. 2. Mr. 
Glowinski takes attendance as N. Ber- 
nadini looks on. 3. Mr. Brennen is 
caught unaware by the camera. 










to 










*^*fc! 










f||K9 




0% 


8S| 


' 


AW 








\\j( 


Si 


1 \ 





mi 



MATHEMATICS 



■ 



72 



IKV^flQ 













- I - 






**o 



"♦"tfjSfc 







BLESS 






Ifii 



iTizervis 




AFTER M 



<*vv 



Eft 33d 



'veja;---' ';-j>v. 



■ 




Shorthand-the discovery of a 
new and appealing language. 
-- H. Milton 



"Taking Care Of Business" 



75 



■ 



H 







wm 



QMS 



Language 



Communication 
Or Confusion? 



Our French class is alot of things- a little bit of understanding a little bit of friendship, a little bit of French, 
and a lot of laughter. 

-- M. Steinbauer 
Spanish let's you realize how much English you don't know! 

-- J. Chruney 
When I come out of French class my mind is still geared towards speaking French and I have to remind myself 
to speak English to people in the halls. 

-- D. Kenney 
I thought I came here to speak Spanish, But I was wrong. It was fun. 

-- J. DeMers (sp. lang. & cult. ) 
. . . enables us to talk to other people around the world, which then enables us to all become closer. 

-- N. Perron 
I think every one should know at least one foreign language. 

-- M. Desroches 
French 5 is a good course for anyone interested in the language, because it is here where all the skills learned 
in the past years are finally put together. 

-- L. Butler 



76 



■Hi- 







I u&mP' 



ins" 




% 



"bes^- 



fc\e*° 



Fisics is phun! 
T. Noble 




f. 



^ 






4 



S 



*sS> 




1. 



m> 



**K.V3 




im 



■v 



I A 



tfl 



OSS 



^ 



^t- 



1*3! 



sbiflS 



v 



» 



^. 






\\ 



V 



fa.u» 



Anatomy gets to the HEART of the matter. It is a 
course where one gets to use his/hers hands --on 
lab days you get to play butcher with the little 
piggies. 

-- J. Rose 



Physics is the study of energy, which everyone usually lacks 
first period Monday morning . 










^ 



&" 



iJ ? 



Stev* 3 * 





jrftft*' 



»t 



tJctf 



J* 



&. 




&&W. 



v^ 



!U^7 e *? e 



tvs&l 



ft*. 



Aft** 



V^s* 



Veft 



-vet 






V 



>A* 



sc 



*rf* 



.dt 



t)eft T 



y#* 



!pet 



»\\^ et 



•yO^ 



saV 



\frft* 



&*?&**•• 



^lw teft c 



a U 



tfve 



Anatomy and Phisiology is an interesting course but should never be 
taken on a full stomach. You discover alot about your body that 



ptBpnu 



iJT!rV:'.s 



l rr^,: 



MM 



amazes you . 
-- D. Pazold 



Anatomy and Phisiology has been very interesting for me. I've really learned alot about the 

human body. 
-- C. Loughlin 



■■*■•-■■.■■■■■■■ 







■*K«nfi 



'.Sis 

kSUM 




The Latin Lords-need more be said?! 



Paula caught in mid-air 



81 



■ 



• _*< 



.v 



■ 

BHMsM 

la B3 









■ 





' 



Mrs. Dire and Mr. Lavallee 
discuss future class room plans. 

Mr. Ligor smiles for the camera 
while on the job of 
lunchtime corridor duty 



Mrs. Conally looks for students, 
as Miss Manteca calls the roll 
in a senior study. 




Mrs. Chandler, a substitute at K. P. 
looks up from her reading 
to see what's going on. 



Mr. Desrosiers and Mr. Kozak, 

the new plumbing teacher, 

take time to eat their lunch. 



Mrs. Beltis 

and Mr. Ha skins prepare to run 

off papers for their classes. 



82 




urn 



> --. , ■ 




83 



tm ■■■"'''■ 



TIB I 



1 1 



I ■ /,• 







I 








There are two days that every student 
of King Philip have in common, our first day 
as Freshmen, and our last day as Seniors. 
Our first day as entering Freshmen, we may 
have suffered a feeling as being the "new kid 
on the block." We felt funny and embarrassed 
when we couldn't find a room, and we kept 
silent for fear of being brought down. 
Through time we realized that we were in the 
same boat as everyone else; we were all here 
to learn. While learning we made friends, 
some that will last a lifetime and some that 
will not. Together with teachers and 
friends we experienced a piece of life we 
could not find elsewhere; and when we 
reached our final year as Seniors, we looked 
back upon those years gone by with hope for 
the future. As Seniors, when we take our 

final walk 
through the 
doors of 
King Philip we 
will leave 
the school 
remembering 
and rekindling, 
all the feelings 
we felt 
through our 
four years 
of being 
a student. 





'> 



nam 



'■■>>■•... 



W.* v \ 



^J 



>> I 



V^i 



>.* ' 



■ ''< 




■v™ 



.''i 



EVaM 



ff# 







■ 




Above; vice-president — Craig Starkey; president — Clark Kinlin; treasurer — Marianne 
DiRe; secretary — Merideth Steinbaur 

Above Opposite Page; Senior Class Council; Armand Bedard, Paula Sciaba, Miss 
Kroll--advisor, Sandy Kunz, Mr. Keimach--advisor, Donna Jones, Seth Tzizik, Kev- 
in Mitchell, Mr. Sumner- -advisor, Clark Kinlin, Marianne DiRe, Craig Starkey, 
Merideth Steinbaur, Irene Biledeau, Linda Soderquist, Cyndi Zagieboylo. 



87 



BR H 




'A* 



19 



V*.iV> 



_ 



m 



^.tf. \Xj{ 






■ 



■ «. ■ 



M 









■ v'M 



I 



■ 



IE 




•*. 



. m 



m 

WL 



I 



.■> 



■ 



I 

I 




90 



MnWH 



■ ^H 







91 



■ .. 



:*.* ij-w! 



_ 




■ 



tt'M 



>.K, 



,.\. 






I 




h -45 



>« -«*\ 





HIV ! V^ _ 






1 P'l 


L ^ 






■ 




/SI 








■auuj 






93 











I 







mm 



■ 



^H ■ 




m 





a&^TFw' 


JSWyy V J HTT. V|->V' *Bf^^ 


f /JN* 


32a • jr r ^^ruKv^-'i 

'."■■"'■■•if* "^. M\^r ^'•)\\JJr\ 'A 


^|^V b * 



95 



■ I G»2 



.'^'X. 



M 



ft 



if 



■■ 




1 ■ 


1 

1 









Ear H • W 


^^^0 Hi 


!B^B/UBi£ 






l^%c9h 








^M 












■Hi 



m 






1 




■' 


■ 

1 

■ 


■ 
■ 

Hi II 


1 
1 • 


1 

■ 



RH 



r Hi 



98 







PHI 



^^H 






Wl 




■ 



■ 



I 



tv^S> 



ilk 







*;..*■ 



■ 













100 



WH 



mS&M 



':!i$A 



>'.*< 









■ 




^M m 



■BBKS 






uA 




**•', 



w 

■ 



.> 





ft**' 






(V 



■I 



102 







l W-', ■ 



:•'<•■- 




I 



■ 




103 



nmgn 




**«. *_J*' ; * 



Vti * 







:*> 



■ 



UTi 



ran 




■ . 



■ ■<£&&/<■ 



.^•ImsP 






H 






^v 



fig 



1 

s 


I 

1 1 



■ 



H 



»< V. 



>*r 



'V 






HB 



■■ 



I 



106 




■ 



mamc. 







<t 



■I 
■I 

■ 



107 



In 



i ■ ■ 

■ 



HhUa 

H IK 

1 rcBlfifl 



"i»;y 




i 



■ 






in 1 







109 






1 1 



H 



n ■ 






HBoF 




tfl 



■ 




!jfiA> 



' Mfli 



9HE 



■ 



M 






■ 











I 






^^i J 



VMM \ 



112 






^BPP^^i^l 




1^ ^D>1 


/^^\ 




nS 


• \1\M In 





JF^KiiffffvJK «■ WM ■■MS 


^^^flS 


>rft 






toic9 

•.V 








MpJM 

Tm 

3 1 




113 






/ '7-v J 



m 



■ 



m 



■ 



l! 



■ 



>*., 







■ 



i . 



I 






■ 




114 





I 

1 \ 


; , A >-yJ| 


"\ 






w. 


1 






ii 


1 


! ^l 


i 








■;,:,$ ' ,' 




^ 


>*f 




/ 




., 



Bfifl 



*% 

* 




■ 

■ 



115 



M 



I ; .i"-r;isi 













rto 



MB 



r >J* 



* f #"*( , t 



1AM 







I 

1 




• 

1 

1 

•> 




IH 






^ 




\ 




I 



■ 







• *■'/ 



■ 



•# l i 



■ I 







rafinf 


Hk9 


WE 


Fw*t* 


CTM 




BkM 


















I i ' 'flBI^I 
















MS 

3V H 

SHI 




121 



OT 



■kjwunu 



mm 



m *• 



V 



I 



I 



■ 



■Ki 






i i X W H 



122 














123 



Ens 

HE 



H 



I vMC: 



H 



A ■ 



•SB9s 




124 



■ 



L»»-\ ^ 






Standing, Left To Right: Vice President; Robert Geromini, 
Secretary; Janet Clark, Treasurer; Tricia Hartley, Seated, 
President; Merideth Crawford. 



- 



^il ^ 



5? i -^ 9> 



%± 



z 




7 



5^ \, 

















■ 



■-*£ 




B 

■ 



WSHL 



« Si 

2HB9£nl 
uraf 

■nal 




R. Broisnan 



Junior Class Council 




<& 



+ *- 



v 



■ B 



i 



M. Bilodeau, S. Bailey, J. Sabatini, S. 
Stockwell, P. Embree, J. Chruney, J. Rose, 
S. Hartley, T. Loughlin, R. Stoddart, L. 
Kenney, M. Belcher, D. Ravinski, M. 
Gunthuer, R. Grady, D. Lawrence, K. Bul- 
lock, S. McNulty, D. Feid, S. Pelletier, 
J. Shepherd, J. Fuery, K. Corsi, L. Mc- 
Cracken, K. Amoling, S. Pothier, D. Cash- 
man, S. Hayden, M. Callahan, E. Wad- 
leigh, S. Underhill, L.Williams, R. Wat- 
remez, C. Tumavicus, D. Ericson, M. Ni- 
sil, N. O'Connell, N. Linton, K. Davin, 
D. Waitkevich. Row One: Vice-President, 
R. Geromini, Secretary, P. Hartley, 
Treasurer, J. Clarke, President, M. Craw- 
ford. 




T. Bonollo 





JX9M^HMIDiSS!IGl£iiQ 



mu 



•i<' 




% ■ 



^^H 







Bfe 






t r ^ I I • 'Si . 

I ■ 




1 



JB 



IB? 



tifl 







131 









:y/, t 



■ 










f? 



^¥ 



r i ^r 1 WA 



w& 



M. Andrews D. Antonitis G. Arena S.Armitage 

T. Bambery C. Banks M. Barnes R. Barney 




■ 







132 





W 











133 




H 




■ 



H I ' , 

• /■ I 

SB 

■ 

, - ! .. < . ray 

H 3 
H 

□ant 

HSsHr 



EH . 










\ 



. t Ik 



Fl 


PI 






i § j 


K ■ M 












^Sf 




r»# 




\ 




1! 




.V *R 


J. Duquette R. Duquette 


D. 


Durant 


B. Elliot A. Epperly 


L. 


Epstein 



EH 



134 



m 




^^H trail 








135 



H 



<v« >• 















■1 
MfiflL 

i 

■ 



3*. 






■ 

i 

■ 

HI 





136 






list BwS H 




J. Lamb 


L. Lanagan 


R. LaPere 


L. 








D. Larson 


J. Lasky 


K. LeBlanc 


D. Legge 


G. Leonard 


P. Leonard 


Larochelle 
B. Less 








M. Lincoln 


R. Lindsey 


S. Long 







137 



J* 



:>,«% 






m 




A1 



H 



■ ■ 






■ 

IHIfl H 



■ 



X* 1 -' 














138 






.*." ? 



« 



?:'.*«.?♦*' ' 











139 



140 




r 



.. 





? 



> r? 



C. Scott 


w. 


G. Suart 


S. Sulham 


D. Thibeau 


St. Pierre 
R. 

Thompson 


P. Thurston 


K. Tibedeau 












**▼«. "^ 




fr 



1 



V 



IE 



7 



N 



^ 



K» "Hi- 


















R. Aj 








^ 



F*£r> 



Armstroi 




\ Andte\ 



Lrms 



K. -Atkins i H. £ain 



■> . 




C. Bibby^ 



C. Bilodeau , jp. 



D. Boulter 



C. Bv 




A^,*"Brosnan 




B.- Bftt]^ * C. Buti\ 



ron ChinnaHnski 



4.. 




W. Darling 



I 




T. 
Daskawitz 



•earac 



J. DaA 




!?V1 




& S. Y^nl 













«ff e 




PteM^ 



W^° 



144 




I 



Mc^ e 







R. KiJlion ! 



G. Long J. Larkin 




T. Leonard 



-J 



.&<* 





pM 






■ "* ** H 


«^ • i 


—^ fl; 


Br^Sk ■ ^ IBh^ 


* -J 


». A 


■R7 ir^'-*. - "^ 


"\ 'Jb 


n*y £» 




■A^j^S 








M"- -- 



MpGtydjclin |P^ 




S. Meyer 



TBEBKx 







S. •Mil! 




i^ 



osession 



D. Murphy 




■VTTl* r 




D. Owen 



C. Owe 





'&13&i£&U 







istoniAi H.„jRUvirt»kii 








■ 



_HBL 



■ 4 




Salalrfone 




Santucci 



Sarcardi 



'M.-»Sh1hfr 





>.. $^f 



G. Snow 




P* 





Thlbadea\i M. Thibeatflt Thompson 



.».* immm 




% 



TJewe^k* P. Trqiiti 







^mm ^ '4£> 






^H 




I ' V. 



I 




■ 



I 



KB 



TOGETHERm 





148 









^ 



-£^ 



3£ 






* 



u 



K i V 


feb^x* 


^ilr^Pii 


'* 








>4 

4 





■ 



a* ifctaL •••%* *^ 






'.•■• ■--■ 



% 



149 




y>jr.M 




WN 






Br 



§§§§ 



SM 






>\ 



<• 






< . 



> 









t 



■ 






!'v 



• 









. t 






'ME 



WV 



wfiL**/ 






Hasus! 


















■ 










^m 








A little knee action from Greg Meyer. 










Scoreboard 




■ 




King 


Philip 


34 


Boston English 


6 






King 


Philip 





Canton 


13 






King 


Philip 


13 


Foxboro 









King 


Philip 


14 


Oliver Ames 


6 


1 




King 


Philip 


21 


N. Attleboro 


13 


1 




King 


Philip 


8 


Sharon 


32 


I 




King 


Philip 





Mansfield 


6 






King 


Philip 


23 


Stoughton 





1 

■ 




King Philip 


6 


Dover- Sherbon 


8 






King 


Philip 


7 


Franklin 


6 


■ 














- 















OIL 



I 



Here are some "funny", unplanned plays guaranteed 
to send any coach into a rage. .1 huddle. They don't 
show up in box office scores but are a vital part of 
every game. 






expert- 
rif atid 

Don Patten receives. 

Punch out option delues by Russ 
Guay. 

Stoughton finally takes a 
dive. 

Tim Darling helps Bob Har- 
rison as he checks to see if 
Stoughton's pads fit properly 







7flyCP. Footbal 

The game's score was 0-0 as the 4th quarter began 
in the annual Thanksgiving Day game between Franklin 
and K.P. The Warriors had moved the ball almost 50 
yds. , and now faced a 3rd down and a goal to go sit- 
uation from the 2 yd. line. The huge crowd braced 
itself for the next play. At the snap of the ball, Chris 
Ray ran around to the right side, received a handoff, 
and broke into the end zone for the touchdown. The 
extra point, kicked by Paul Marcelino was good and 
King Philip ended their very successful season tied for 
third place in the Hockomock League with a 5-3 record. 
Overall the Warriors stood at 6-4. 

King Philip opened the season with an impressive 
34-6 victory over Boston English. The Warrior attack 

was led by the outstanding running of Jimmy Kirby who rushed for a total of 73 yds. , scoring two touchdowns. The team dropped 
their second game to Canton in a 13-0 defeat but made up for it as they walked over Foxboro in a complete reversal of the prev- 
ious score. This game was characterized by an outstanding defensive effort by Warriors Steve Finnigan, Tim Darling, Mark Geib, 
Dave Briggs, Randy Blood, and Russ Guay. Continued next page 




-1 




ttH >* 






c - ? 


^ 


X 



supei 



King Philip next met Oliver Ames in the annual homecoming game. It was a 
superb effort as the Warriors rolled on to their 3rd victory by defeating OA 14-6. 
The most valuable player of the game was certainly Senior Dave Blasko, who scored 
two touchdowns, made an interception, recover- 
ed a fumble and made numerous key unassisted 
tackles. Arch rival North Attleboro was next in 
line and was easily disposed of by the red hot 
Warriors. The game was an all around action- 
packed thriller and had to rank among the best 
Warrior performances in five years. King Philip 
was set back in their next two games losing to 
Sharon, 32-9 and Mansfield, 6-0, as the Warr- 
iors hit the midseason blues. In both games, K. 
P. was hampered by bad breaks as they came 
several times to within yards only to be held 
back. 

K. P. f s next victory came against Stoughton 
as the Warriors stomped on the Black Knights en 
route to a 23-0 shutout. Quarterback Greg Meyer 
teamed up with Bob Finnegan and led the Warr- 
iors to their fifth win. Finnegan had six receptions 
or 117 yards and two touchdowns. 

In their next outing, King Philip could put it all to- 
gether, dropping a heartbreaking 8-6 decision. 

By the time Thanksgiving game rolled around, however, 
the Warriors were ready and waiting! K.P. 's defense 
couldn't have been better as they held Franklin to a mere 6 
points. Offensive Turkey Day standouts were Dave Blasko, 
Alan Urko, and Chris Ray, who led the mighty Warriors 
victory. 

Tim Darling was named the game's most valuable player, 
performing outstandingly at defense as well as catching sev- 
eral passes. The season was a successful one in every aspect 
as the Warriors put together a fine record beating the major- 
ity of Hockomock league including the rivals Franklin and 
North Attleboro. 

By S. Butler 





Wait a minute — I'm supposed to be oi 
top. 



opp. pg. above-Rw 1 P. Marcelino, D. 
Briggs, R. Harnois, R. Heinz, R. Harrison, 
T. Darling, G. Meyer, R. Guay, S. Finne- 
gan, J. Kirby, M. Geib, J. Carchidi, D. 
Blasko, A. Urko, E. Brown, Rw2 S. Bailey, 
S. Odams, R. Geromini, M. Guenther, S. 
Hume, P. Embree, J. Chruney, C. Ray, 
R. Blood, K. Mitchel, D. Hoyle, J. Rose, 
S. Harley, G. Kennedy, Rw3 G. Sewart, 
R. Guisti, J. D. Looney, J. Chruney, M. 
Shepard, D. Mathews, M. Poirier, S. Bros- 
nan, J. Winter, J. Bouche, J. Ragucci, 
T. Rose Rw4 T. Mahoney, R. Jones, K. 
Thompson, P. Davies, D. Patten, B. Fin- 
negan, S. Hayse, M. Webster, G. Sweed, 
L. Ferns, T, Lewicki, Rw5 J. Heinz, C. 
Dean, B. Leveroni, R. Stock, P. Waldron, 
cches Rice, Lombard, Summarian, Hart- 
ley, Donnelly, Schmidt opp. pg. below 
right-Rwl M. Perry, G. Dias, S. Marcin, 
L. Perrins, J. Kelleher, J. Manning, D. 
McCusker, L. Damion, K. Dolan, B. 
Armitage, Rw2 R. Dory, M. Peters, D. 
Boulter, G. Snow, P. Salamone, R. Mc- 
Glockan, R. Lewis, j. Bishop, M. Rose, 
J, Cloudier, J. Murray, Rw3 S. Thompson, 
S. Hill, P. Ericks, M. Ravinski, R. Guay, 
R. Ray, C, Morse, C. Copper, F. Lewicki, 
M. Shaw, Rw4 J. Flannery, G. Roberts, 
T. Harrison, R. Couer, cches Lombard 
Rice, Donnelly, Mngrs-Amidon, Hooper, 
McKinnon Below Left Captains Meyer, 
Finnegan, Darling, Guay 




All league defensive tackle. 



if*. '..*':?!: 



wm 



■ ■ 




^H .^fii'jKT/ 



VfcE* 



</:' 








Kneeling L To R: B. Gifford, T. Gotshall, J. Porier, D. Owen, B. Hanlon, 
S. Butler, M. Corsi, G. Duquette, R. Soderquist, Standing L To R: Coach 
Bertelletti, G. Dumas, S. Edwards, P. Palmborg, K. Van Voorhis, D. 
McLaughan, D. Villemare, C. Villemare, D. Villemare, B. Smith, S. 
Sandtandreu. 




I 



Left To Right: Capts. D. McLaughan, M. Dumas, Coach Bertelletti and 
D. Villemare. 





Scott Finishes 



»-:-•.* 



156 



CROSS 



■ % 




You may have noticed those solitary figures in green sweatsuits jogging lonely miles through the murky, rainy weather 
of a Wrentham fall. These intrepid souls, doing their running despite cars, weather, trees and the occasional dog with no 
respect for Green and Gold were the members of K.P. 's winning cross country team. 

Led to an 11-5 record by the running of the Senior Captain Denny McLaughlin, Seniors twins Donny (captain) and Dan 
Villemere, and their Frosh brother Charlie, and Soph. Tommy Gotchall the cross-country team suffered losses only to league 
dominator O. A. , The Sharon Eagles and Foxboro. 

Coach Bertilletti looks for a (excellent season in '78 behind the likes of Charlie Villemere, and Tony Sepe but regrets the 
loss of TomGotchall who moved to 
Fort Lauderdale. 

The girl runners, although not in 
an official league, obtained a 6-6 
record overall, Frosh runner, Laurie 
Richards performed exceptionally, 
boding well for the future. 





Kneeling: L To R, G. Grube, E. Shrunan, C. Butler, L. Richards, L. Fisher, Standing: 
L To R, J. Jaworski, L. Hamlon, Coach Bertelletti, M. Dumes, K. Corsi, M. Dumas. 



COUNTRY 



157 






in H M spji 
rflJn kwN "VrV 




K.P. 


BOYS 


VISITORS 


27 


Canton 


32 


40 


Oliver Almes 


17 


23 


N.A. 


36 


29 


Foxboro 


30 


25 


Franklin 


30 


19 


Mansfield 


40 


24 


Sharon 


24 


17 
18 


Stoughton 
Canton 


44 
44 


44 


Oliver Ames 


18 


16 


N.A. 


40 


28 


Foxboro 


30 


20 


Franklin 


40 


18 


Mansfield 


40 


20 


Sharon 


28 


15 


Stoughton 


40 



K.P. 



GIRLS 

Canton 

N.A. 

Franklin 

Canton 

O.A. 

Foxboro 

N.A. 

Franklin 

Sharon 



VISITORS 
20 
25 
34 
27 
44 
44 
29 
38 
17 



Middle, LToR: P. Palmborg, M. 
Dumas, B. Hanlon, L. Butler, B. 
Gifford, D. Owens 



-«*\ iN*- * 



S/ 




■-m.' " +WZK 



■■i 



■ 



I 



I 




■ 





L. To R. , 1st. 
Row; D. Snow, K. 
Stewart, N. Plum- 
mer, N. Linton, J. 
Ellis, C. Wood- 
hams, C. Loughlin, 
A. Bergman, Coach 
Pfeffer. 2nd Row; 
J. Buchinski, H. 
Shilo, K. Brown, D. 
Pezold, E. DuVar- 
ney, D. Brown, P. 
McKeown, R. 
Brosnan. 



160 



'£» ,'vi 



'-''■■■ r .- f. 




Bottom Row: R. Russell, D. Whyte, A. Brosnan, L. McCarthy, S. Bourque B Lawrence, G. 

"low- P Cole S Kaine, K. Amidon, L. Edwards, V. Wenzel, S. Hendry, M. Grady, 




IH € C IK IE y 




- 



Although field hockey- 
is widely regarded as a 
sport exclusively for 
girls, it can easily appeal 
to athletes of both sexes. 
It has the form of football, 
the action of soccer, and 
the coordination of golf. 
It is a very demanding 
team sport. The sprints 
can be unendurable to the 
inexperienced runner and 

ball-handling can be tormenting and exasperating, but, with enough practice, the success of a 

good player can be very fulfilling to the point of satisfaction. 

Confidence plays a great part in the success or failure of a player. A good player cannot 

be afraid of the ball. She must be able to handle it without reservations. 

Field hockey is a game which demands coordination, teamwork, and confidence to make a 

successful team. 




161 









■ 



■ 









1 

■ 



I 



162 








Varsity Hoc- 
key: Top Row-- 
Right Coach 
Gallerani, C. 
Kinlin, K. Kel- 
ly, M. Stock- 
man, J. Buck, 
R. Blood, F. 
Coles, E. 
Blood, G. 
Arena, Man- 
ager M. Pet- 
rovick. Bot- 
tom Row, 
Left -Right: D. 
Petruchick, B. 
Bullock, D. 
McElwee, B. 
Holmes, J. 
Zaccardi, D. 
Russell, S. 
Odams, miss- 
ing photo- - 
C.~ Ray. 




lark Kinlin goes in for a slap shot. 




Though the Warriors certainly gave a hundred 
all year, they could not seem to put it all to- 
gether for a successful season. 

After a fine start, including two wins and a tie 
in the three, opening, non- league contests, the 
Warriors problems began. 

Perhaps the story of the year rested with the 
tragic death of Scott Walker. The loss of Scott not 
only meant the loss of a fine hockey player, 
but of the happy go- lucky friend and 
teamate to the entire squad. 

In their first league 
contest; the Warriors 
dropped the deci- 
sion to Stough- 
ton, 6-2. 
Goals 

bv »/->v V V^O) Kevin 

Kelly and 

Mike Stockman 
were not enough as the 
Stoughton Pucksters clearly 
deminated the Warriors dampened 
spirits . 

Dale McElwee sparked K. P. to a 3-1 victory- 
over Foxboro in the first game of 1977. Dale scored 
two goals and assisted on the other as goalie Bobby 
Holmes, a hockomock league all star, turned away 
27 shots. 

After a heartbreaking 3-1 loss to league champs, 
Canton, the Warriors romped over North Attleboro 
6-3. Leading the trampling was Jim Zaccardi (4 
goals) and Duncan Russell (3 goals). 

The enjoyment of this fine win was short-lived 
as it sent the Warriors into an eight game losing 
streak. Averaging 1.2 goals a game during this 
stretch, the Warriors tournement hopes were drowned. 
With the loss of Jim Zaccardi and Clark Kinlin to 
injuries the remaining members of the team tried to 
pick up the slack. 

Though super efforts were turned in by several 
players; including; Bob Bullock, Frank Coles, 
Chris Ray and Randy Blood; the task proven to be 
too great. 

After a win over North Attleboro, led by a 
Dwight Petruicik hat trick, the Warriors ended 
their season with a loss to Canton. 

It was a tough season that many would possibly 
like to forget But, one thing the K. P. Warriors 
can be proud of; through all their bad luck and 
headaches, they played their hearts out all season. 



163 



OKtVHi 




Dave Holmes kicks it out 



Above Left --Dale Mc- 
Elwee as he trips an O. 
A. defenseman. Above- 
-Bob Bullock passes to 
Frank Coles for a goal 
in the Canton game. Be- 
low- -Mike Stockman 
cuts through Oliver 
Ames' defense. 



164 



mm 




, » 



¥ 



fad rac< 



the 



Kevin Kelly flys through a tur: 



165 










■ 



■KdH 

Hi 

Hr 






WWtMLfTlfTMJl 




Dave Hoyle 




■■■■■■ 















« « 



,VJ/(^w 



t * 






Left To Right, Standing In Back: J. Wilson, Mark Lewin, T. Laughlin, B. Prantise, T. Callahan, R. Stock, D. Charron, C. 
Duvarney, G. Duquette, B. Binney, R. Stock, V. Tamburina, W. Harlon, 2nd Row: Coach Simmerarian, S. Moley, M. Calla- 
han, J. Chruney, J. Looney, J. Candela, R. Jones, C. Villemaire, D. Brannigan, D. Hoyle, S. Brosnin, S. Kelleher, W. Lang, 
J. Davies, B. Smith, R. Lindsey, B. Perron, J. Dupont, Coach Fink, 3rd Row: J. Marir, K. VanVoorhis, G. Dumas, P. Palm- 
borg, P. Larlan, L. Arvidson, S. Butler, B. Harrison, Jim Chruney, J. Kirby, D. Villemaire, J. Poirier, G. Workmen, B. 
Treweek, J. Mullaney, D. Erickson, D. O'Connell, K. Ganamian, R. Russell, D. Mailhot, S. Benker, L. Hanlon, C. Butler, 
D. Clark, N. Larson, R. Sodaquist, D. Helfelfinger, Carlton Dean 




winter 
track 



K.P. 


SCOREBOARD 


VISITORS 


52 


Sharon 


• 34 


42 


Franklin 


44 


31 


Mansfield 


56 


54 


Foxboro 


32 


54 


N.A. 


32 


57 


Stoughton 


29 


53 


Canton 


33 



This winter track team has seen one of its 

best seasons since it was first started. The 

team came the closest to beating Franklin 

as it ever has . 
The league was very closely matched in 
competition. The team has been beaten by 
Dniy two teams, Franklin and Mansfield. It 
has had its ups and downs in terms of atti- 
tudes and turnouts . But in the end everyone 
put their best foot forth to come up on top of 
the pile with a record of 5 and 2 . 
There have been girls on the team before 
but this year they proved to have the biggest 
turnout ever . The girls do not get their own 
private meets but in some instances they 
have their own heats . It is not always just 
girls against girls though, in some in- 
stances they must compete in events against 
boys . Sometimes they even beat an occa- 
sional boy. 



tt : 






V 




■ 










M 



m, 










■ W^ : i?+W' 



: &M 



■ 




■ 



« ■ i >«_ 



(Mfffl 






Though it was a sour four win, fifteen loss season a 
few of the team's finest athletes stood out. High scor- 
ers for the squaws were: Nan Plumber with 196 points, 
Captain, Dottie Pezold with 118 pts. , Kathy Corsi with 
110 pts, and Carol Woodhams with 106. 
^ With captains Laurie Harmon and Kathy Woodhams , 
Coach Smith is expecting a much better record next 
year. 

GIRLS BASKETBALL 
SCOREBOARD (Varsity) 



KP 


OPP 


35 


39 


25 


53 


39 


49 


53 


* 41 


30 


47 


58 


* 52 


38 


46 


48 


52 


47 


48 


37 


43 



* Games won by KP 



Bishop F. 

Sharon 

Canton 

Hopkinton 

Franklin 

Stoughton 

Mansfield 

O. A. 

North 

Foxboro 



KP 

43 

36 
50 
37 
62 
31 
33 
35 
38 



* 

* 



OPP 

72 
47 
31 
38 
54 
32 
45 
47 
52 











K. Woodhams goes for 
two 









*Mr v ■ , J ;m% 



w 









" 
■ 




f 


■ .- ■ 










^^*"-4^» ^H 


911 


HSZl^SB 


1 Joyce breaks 


away 1 











IKK' 







■ 



Vfif> 










m 



V,w. 






•i I - 



UL 



I 



1 



Left To Right: Coach Rice, Coach 
White, Ron Sullivan, Greg Meyer, 
Bob Finnigan, Gary Smith, Leo Burke, 
Alan Urko, Andy Martin, Kevin 

Thompson, Dennis 
McLaughlin, Joe 
Johnson, Mike Mc- 
Vane, Phil Guthro, 
Captain Craig Star- 
key, Coach Schmidt, 
Managers Jim Fitz- 
gerald, John Rose, 
Tom Rapoza. 



The disgusted reactions of a bad call. 





176 





■ H 



^■i 



/ 







I 



Urko goes in for a layup. 






Who's the cute chick in the second row? 



177 






1x5 
vote 



^mm 



y ■' 



f> 




Denny McLaughlin on the "Ultimate Lay- 







MS ekM 




■ 

s 

m 






Deca dots it 



A "Wednesday is Prince Spaghetti Day" 
supper took place in the K.P. cafeteria on 
Nov. 3, 1976. 



180 



The affair was staged by DECA and turned 

out to be a tremendous success both 

for DECA and for those who attended. 

The dinner included spaghetti in a tangy tomato sauce, meatballs, salad, italian bread, and 
coffee. It was an "all you can eat" occasion and the price paid was well worth it. 

DECA took the opportunity to sell some of their merchandise; ice scrapers, jewelry and buttons 
were big sellers and the school store was open to inspection for interested customers . 

Serving the spaghetti was Rick Shaw, Steven Cochran, and other helpers. Cooking the "banquet" 
was Billy Hewitt, Carlton Dean, Randy Gilchrist and others. Working the store was Nancy Linton 
and Brad Billingsley. Those selling buttons included Eileen Newell and Lynn White. 

Leslie Ribero and Bernadette Lawrence sold ice scrapers along with Diane Waitkevich and Robin 
Stodart, who sold jewelry. 

Thanks to all the DECA students and especially those hungry guests who put away the food, the 
spaghetti supper 1976 was a fine time for all. 



■.-/■."■ 











J 


i 






,.< 






^KF^ 




Top (LToR)-Rw. 1: Mr. Ober, J. Callahan, C. MacAdam, K. Connors, K. Kennerson, C. 

Guyot, P. Cox, M. Cornell. Rw. 2: R. Wolfgang, P. Tomeo, J. Parker, R. Gilchrist, F. Coles, 

L. Daigle. Middle (L To R)-Rw. 1: Mr. Guillemette , L. White, E. Newell, E. Matthys, P. 

Payne, D. Waitkevich, N. Linton. Rw. 2: J. Wickland, W. Robertson, B. Billingsley, A. 

Carder, R. Shaw. Bottom (LToR)-Rw. 1: C. Poisson, B. Lawrence, L. Mackmnon, J. Bryant, 

R. Stodart, L. Ribero, J. Lawless. Rw. 2: S. Towne, S. Galvin, D. Mackie, C. Dean, P. 

Gilson, A. Perry, S. Cochran. 



181 




MODEL 
SEN ATI 

and 
UN 

DELEGATES 




How would 
you like to de- 
clare wars, 
make laws and 
decide the fate 
of men and 
nations. Ten 

K.P. students lead by Miss Bremer did just that. 

These students spend two months preparing for the 
big event. Each of the schools is allowed to submit four 
bills to the senate. All must be thoroughly researched 
and the student must have loads of facts to back himself 
up. Kent Van Voorhis sponsored a bill for the partial re- 
turn of Panama Canal Zone. Cathy McCoy, John Bernard, 
and Clark Kinlin tried to legalize mercy killing with their 
euthenassia bill. A bill establish bilingual schools for 
migrants was sponsored by Ann Marie Lambert. Lars 
Arvidson and Scott Butler worked on helping the other 
delegates put together arguments. 

The climax came on April 14 when ninety students 
from all over the league converged on spancing new N. A. 
High. Our delegates were assigned to committees where 
they discussed debated and fought over the various bill 
before them. Those bills which passed in committee 
went before the full senate the next day. Although none of 
K. P. s bills made it to be floor there was heated debate 
on such hot subjects as legalied prostitution and capital 
punishment. There was such controversy around all of 
them that none passed. Everyone had a fantastic time. 
You know your never too alow to play "Lets Pretend" 

Left-Right C. Loughlin, Scott Butler - U.N. Delegates 









® § ® 












National Merit Scholars in K. P. 
This year King Philip had three commended stu- 
dents from the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude test; 
Cathy McCoy, Tom Callahan and Jane Henderson. 

1 These students, while they did not 

qualify as National Merit Scholars were 
nevertheless, in the top 2% nationwide on 
test results. 
The day the results came in those 
three illustrious scholars were busily 
working in their seventh period classes 
when they were summoned to Mr. La- 
vine' s office. Understandably nervous, 
they were led in, only to find our prin- 
cipal grinning with three letters of Com- 
mendation. Good going, Folks! 



Above Left- From Left: C. Bouffard, P. McKay, A. Be- 
dard, M. Steinbauer, S. Uhl, P. Brush, S. Kunz, M. 
Dire, C. Kinlin, A. Lambert, I. Bilodeau, L. Du- 
quette, M. Dumas, E. DuVarney, V. Pres, S. Butler, 
Tres, S. Williams, Pres, L. Butler, J. Henderson, J. 
Conrad, D. Snow, S. Tennyson, P. Palmborg, Adv. 
Mr. Lanciaux, missing, A. Colletto, R. Guay, D. 
Kenney, C. McCoy, T. Nason, D. Pezold, Sec. 



183 






i ' 






r * I 

1 







^ 



7* 



T***i 



•*»j 



A 



■ 



^iA 



p 9' 



.» -» 





**pNfc 



■ 







","■'. * 






L. v* 



i 






I 



t ■ 




-* **••■♦>* '■*.• 



?<KKri 







■ ■■%:- 



M 



i£>tubent Council 



Standing From Left To Right: Tina Ricci, Ken Tomes, Dave Mailot, Carl Evans, Beth Patruchik, M. Perron, Steve Finni- 
gan, Seth Tizick, Helane Leuthola. Sitting From Left To Right: Diane Brown, Diane Ravinski, Lisa Kenney, L. Edwards, 
Lauren Butler, Mr. Houde. Missing Lars Avidson, Vice-Pres. 



184 



T * EWHTlfvKXVjil 



i£>tutient #obemment 

The Student Council is an organization made up of 3 students from each class, 3 voca- 
tional reps. , and the RAC member. The group represents the entire school to the adminis- 
tration and runs activities for all students. Activities: 1.) Dance-to kick off Spirit week. 
2. ) Spirit Week 3. ) Powderpuff Football Game 4. ) Mini -Spirit Week and Spirit Chain Compe- 
tition 5. ) Selling coffee and donuts before 
Thanksgiving Day Game. 6. ) Christmas 
Dance 7. ) Valentine Dance 




<g~5 ^ 







"*~~*J^B 


WW K 




D 




1 


; i 





s 



zm 




i£>tutient 
Committee 

The Student Advisory Committee re- 
presents the students to the School Com 
mittee. The Committee is made up of a 
representative from each class, a voca- 
tional rep. , the RAC member, and the 
President of the Student Council. 



V 



i 







> 










N 







■ 



■ 






■ 



M 

<iBi 






i 



Ǥ " 



te 



i*» .^v 



« 



From Left- P. Maduskuie, L. 
Cooke, C. Loughlin, D. Gatie, 
S. Benker, L. McCracken, V. 
MacPhee, K. Brule, D. Mac- 
aione, K. Stewart, J. Lamb, 

B. Dire, P. Clow, J. Jaworski, 

C. Schubert, K. Peebles, A. 
Amoling, A. Mailhot, G. 
Plante, M. Mclntyre, L. Rea- 
dell, J. Rogers, Mrs. Gimache 






This is the last year for the future teachers club at K. P. , unless 
a marked improvement in involvement is shown. Miss Bremer, the 
advisor, is somewhat disgusted at an average turn out at a meeting, 
3 people. When asked what the club will be doing this year, her re- 
sponse was negative. She said that the club itself would to nothing, 
but the seniors who want to student teach can still do so. Asked if 
seniors next year would be able to student teach- she said there are 
no students in the group now who will be eligible next year- so even 
that important aspect will not be offered. 

It's too bad that a club which can help so much will not be around 
to offer that help. In the past, future teachers held after school 
seminars 
with people 
in different 
areas of the 
teaching pro- 
fession; went 
to different 
colleges and 
schools to 
look into 
their career 
offerings and 
teacher 
education. 



Standing: C. Oduardi, Pres. K. 
Tobin, V. Pres. K. McCoy, S. 
Piculell. Kneeling: A. Lam- 
bert, D. Jones, D. Calleaux, 
M. DiRe, P. Chmielinski. 





y 


Hi* 

■Plw 




f - - 1 1 










1 

i 1 


■ m 


7 J « J 







t\ "■*•* 




^Mr'a 


w\ 













.*> 



,-v 



t<- 



186 



v^. 



1 





"*x ■ • .•NS» rv*> * mat 




From Left-Mrs. Alter, C. Turner, G. Turner, R. Merrill, J. Rose, M. Gagnon, C. Kinlin, V. 
MacPhee, D. Saylor, N. Glowinski, S. Barry, J. Powers, G. Fluck, S. Williams, S. Kelly, P. 

Brush. 

^SACHEM CHEM CLUB 




Standing From Left-B. Smith, L. 

Duquette, G. Plante, Mr. Murphy, K. 

Newell, P. Chmielinski, D. 

Chmielinski, D. Calleaux. Sitting, N. 

Larson, R. Daniel. 




187 



■ 



H r 




■ 







-^ 







Over 80 K. P. 'ers embarked on a 
mountain -climbing expedition Thursday, 
November 11. They attempted to climb 
Mt. Osceola in the White Mountains of 
New Hampshire. 

Sleepy -eyed and cold, they boarded 
the bus here at K. P. at 5:30 a.m. Much 
anticipation was felt on the bus to the 
mountain, which took approximately 4 
hours, one way. 

Temperatures fell to the low teens at 
the peak with about 1 1/2 feet of snow 
covering everything. It was a long, cold 
trip up and back down. But, despite the 
conditions, nearly all of the hikers made 
it to the summit. 

the great 

Mt. Osceola, which has a height of 
4,396 feet, overlooks a series of other 
mountains. Had it not been for the wea- 
ther conditions the visibility would have 
been much better. 

The information sheets, before the 
trip, said that it would be a physically 
exhausting trip. This was evident as 
nearly everyone fell asleep on the bus 
ride home. 




* 



*M 



fa 



s 



1/ 



<^ 



■ 



t 



Jutk 



* 






Myj" 



L*l, 



*•■. 






♦ *?• « 






■r ...i;- ■ 



mUt* 



- s 

1 






mi # 









"5— ^ 



^g 6 








■£* 7 8 

fi ^* 1 

L M 







.« .«,'-*- •'**^*f 






i!HMil.B 





» C< 



tJfi 



By Ann -Marie Lambert 

A club that was really on the go at K. P. was the 
Volunteer Service Club. The club was started eleven 
years ago by Miss Szczepaniak. Its purpose was to 
have a group of volunteers to help teachers do odd 
tasks. The V. S. C. expanded over the years to under- 
take community activities, but the school remained 
its main concern. 

During the first four months of the 1976-77 school 
year the club attempted and successfully completed 
several ambitions projects. 

Among them was a swing-a-thon on November 14. 

Volunteer Service 

This event took place behind the Plainville Elementary 
School. The object was to keep five swings going for 
ten hours (7:25 a.m. to 5: 25 p.m. ) to raise money for 
club activities. Towards the end of the event several 
members couldn't get on the swings, no they hadn't 
quit, but their counterparts wanted to finish the last 
four hours themselves. Every one had a great time and 
a nice deposit went to the V. S. C. bank account. Some 
of the money earned at the Swing-a-thon was used to 
benefit two area families. They were given gift certi- 
ficates to make their holidays brighter. 

One Tuesday afternoon six members of the club 
tackled the task of cleaning the graffitti off the seats in 
the auditorium. The club felt that since the auditorium 
was used by all three communities, it should be kept 
clean. 

These activities, along with others such as State 
School work and Christmas Caroling made the Volun- 
teer Service Club an extremely important part of K. P. 
life. 




■ 



■I ■■ BHH 



Bottom Row. E. Waterly, A. Mailhot, A. Benedetti, 
B. Lawrence, P. McKay, V. McPhee, C. McCoy, A. 
Lambert, L. Duquette, D. Jones. 2nd Row. L. Will- 
iams, M. Mullaney, S. Kelly, D. Gatie, P. Adams. 





■I I M 



nmiWHH 

^H ■ 







V 



< 








r\»*: v 




lioctttq 



Where's the party? 




le colorguard leads the way. 



i 



1 



1 






w-jf 


r 

«* 






1 1 


fi/i 


I' 




/ 'ij 


i 


J 



£tf£ (TRGUAOi D 



practice makes perfect! 



193 



Ff* 




Left To Right; Front To Back : R. Hamois, R. Delorey, L. Sweeney, G. Moritz, M. Casey, M. Kelly, J. Moran, L. Previtt, C. 
Lousa, C. Emry, P. Brush, R. Sullivan, Next Row: T. Hartley, D. Spragg, D. Kelly, J. Mullaney, K. Collins, S. Holda, K. 
Holda, R. Caroll, C. Cindric, M. Miller, S. Wickland, L. Shruhan, D. Hofenson, C. Shebert, J. Tennyson, K. Evans, K. Eas- 
terbrooks, Mrs. Pope, Mrs. Dombaski, D. Warder, C. Cook, C. Pass, N. McPhee, L. Gomes, S. Owens 





O.E.A. is a dynomite organization for students 
interested in having fun as well as sharpening their 
office skills . With a growing membership they 
sponsored many events this year. 
Leadership, poise, good altitude, service and 
vocational competence are the goals of this excit- 
ing organization. This years senior officers are 
Martha Kelley, President; Mary Casey, V.P.; and 
Ginney Mavrit, Secretary. Students with their ad- 
visor Miss Brunelli learn the principles of good 
business which will help them get responsible jobs 
on the outside. Goodtimes through fund raising, 
competitions and lending service are also part of 
the Office Educational Assoc. Cleaning up Sweat, a 
food basket for a needy family, helping host the 
open house, typing for a blood mobile were some 
of their service activities . Their annual fantastic 
flea market raised $1200. and attracted craftsman 
from all over . They spent a swinging weekend in 
March at the competitions in Sturbridge. But it's 
not all work as they bowled and roller skated Hal- 
loween night away . No matter what everyone 

seems to have a good time. 



K 



LWHQHtrf 







Snack Time 



I • 4 1 ■ S 




Students Get Involved 
In State Government 



Massachussett's Boys State is 
sponsored by the American Legion 
of each town in the state every 
eleventh grade teacher he or she 
possesses the qualities of leader- 
ship, sportsmanship and the over 
all ideals of The American Legion 
Organization. 

The Boys Staters from Wren- 
tham in 1976included, Clark Kin- 
lin and Greg Tyo, (Paul Marceli- 
no). The delegates from Norfolk 
was Lars Arvidson (Kent Van Voor- 
his: alternate) 

Assumption College in Wor- 



chester was the site of the activi- 
ties as boys from all over the state 
became familiar with the mechanics 
of state and local governments 
through classes and other various 
activities. 

Boy State wasn't all classes how- 
ever, as the King Philip Boys found 
time to meet new people, complete 
in athletic events and enjoy dorm 
life for the first time. Remarked 
the Boys Staters in September 
"Boys State was the best time I 
had all summer". 



m 



zS^E 






H 



WKPH: From 

Left- ' 
N. Glowinski 
S. Tzizik 
B. Lawrence 
G. Plante 
D. Pezold 
G. Dumas 
S. Butler 
Mr. White 
G. Kiff 
L. Arvidson 
S. Sewart 
P. Costa 
M. Mulany 

Cleanup: From 
Left- 
S. Flower 
D. Kenny 
N. Ray 
K. Kelly 
M. Murphy 
M. Mensel 
S. Tzizick 
K. LaPierre 

B. Foley 
J. Guy 
D. Kohut 
V. Inistasi 

C. Barnes 




i hu f fed & i 



'til i cleaned it oil up! 



197 



H 



■ 



!.■•«, 



■ 




n jWemomum 



What comes to yam? mind when someone mentions the word Dragon? Most people think of a gigantic green mon- 
r that breathes f^(e. Well, most CBers think of a fifteen year old girl named Kristen Fuller. Kristen was known 
the CB radio a^he Dragon of Dragon Gulch. (Dragon was her handle, /or name on the radio) Dragon had to drop 
of school l^rc year because she was one of the many who had the disaase that killed Lou Gehrig many years ago. 
Dragon w^fon the CB from the time she got up in the morning untilfthe time she went to sleep at night. Dragon 
would be busy talking to older people like Midnight Printer, Greybeard/ Pinetree, Startreck, and numerous others. 
When the kids were sick and home from school, you would .also hear them talking to the Dragon of Dragon Gulch. 
After a while word got around to almost all the CBers that the Draaon was very sick. So the CBers decided that 
they wanted to do something for her. In December, 1976, a group of JtBers got together at Busy Bee's and made a 
large collage. It included everyone's picture and handle on it, so thai Dragon would know what everyone looked 
e. A few of the CBers brought the collage to Dragon while many oichers stood outside her house and sang Christ- 
as Carols. Despite the frigid weather, the warmth of affection touched old and young alike. 
In response to the CBers kindness, Dragon made Christmas cards^for her CB friends. The cards, personally de- 
signed by Dragon, pictured an angel outside and a small green drag 
wishes" in CB jargon. 

Dragon had promised to be on the CB at seven on Christmas E^ 
noUifl Mftcaaon had died the night before. 



n inside. Its message: 3's and 8's or "best 
All channel 13 was tuned in- but Dragon was 



^^u 
^^H 



Em 



MI 




o 



PEOPLE 
Cold wind tears over crawling streets 

As the shuffling masses scuttle and scurry 

to unseen destinations. 

The plastic faces and plastic faces 

and plastic places 

All fade away only to leave the golden 

memory of your friends. 

A passing handshake, a fleeting glance 

A pat on the back or a kick in the pants. 

Carousing around with "the boys" in town 

or a fireside chat. 









A caring face — a warm embrace. 
When tears fall or when happiness bubble, 
Your friends are all there to make 
your heart and mind so free and clear. 
And I am sorry when one must leave us 
Although the memory lives on and the 
spirit thrives and the people and places 
remain quite alive — Your friend is gone 
though you took him for granted. 
To lose a friend is the worst thing 
of all. 

- C. Kinlin 



199 



',£*•>, 



IE 






c When all the work is 



( 




h ^fl HHBSI 



done it is time for fun 




WSM 



IMBUi 



W 



KXK 



i.;.- 'M 



.V .r* 




Kent serves chicken to raise bread 






•"dry 



in 




iJBC 




0% 



W*ti& 






Tfr 



■ 





■■■Hi 




A thousand hours of labor , late nights , 
and plenty of blood , sweat and tears are 
what it has taken for this years staff to pro- 
duce the Chieftain. 
The staff started out with forty eager 
beavers and boiled down to ten or so work- 
a- holies. Working almost every night until 
4:30 and some time until 8:00 or 9:00 is 
not for everybody . Neither is going crazy 
trying to meet seemingly impossible dead- 
lines. Ms. Podgers indespensible , profes- 
sional knowledge helped to change this 
book from a dream to reality . Mrs . Sussan 
and her super ad salesmen Darlene Law- 
rence and Lisa Boyden saved us from bank- 
ruptcy. Pam Jelinek's fingers nearly went 



Ann-Marie Lambert designs a layout 



blistered from typing and John Bernard 
wrote and edited with the speed and effi- 
ciency of a garbage disposal. Lisa Chut- 
jian , Pat Costa , Cindy Fuller and Darlene 
Lawrence were Jacks of all trades . Without 
Shirley Uhl those pages would be blank ex- 
cept for copy. Gary Turner and Tom Del- 
Signore added a touch of artistic uniqueness 
to the book. Section Editors Gerard Dumas, 
Ann Marie Lambert, Paula Trahan, and 
Kent VanVhooris nearly had nervous break- 
downs chasing down stories and pictures and 
burning the midnight oil to meet the dead- 
lines . Greg Tyo in addition to doing plenty 
of pages of his own put everything together 
to make the Chieftain what it is . 



/, 




J 



202 



Gary Turneir in typical 
state of yearbook staff 



J 



not another 



deadline?!? 




'am Jelinek works on 





rodgers discuss 



■ *' 



Editor-in-Chief Greg 
Tyo assists Tom 
DelSignore 




Jeanne Albert recently hit 
from behind 




K * 



% 



^ 



V* 



**i 




^■^^^^i^ll^p 




' 



Wv pi £L+ 

*, f Hp Chieftain staff has an advantage over all other clubs here at 
^^Ar j Philip. As editors of the school's most popular publication, we 
VKvolve ourselves in almost everything that happens around us. From 
the football games in October to the prom in May, The Chieftain sticks 
its camera in almost every event. This gives us the advantage of noti- 
cing how our school changes and how it stays the same. 

The class of seventy-seven started something new in a sense or 
school spirit and unity. More functions like, suppers, dances, and 
assemblies have all added to our education. We look back on float 
meetings, Friday nights at Dixies, Dances at St. Judes, and the 
donkey basketball game to reminisce about some of the 'best years 
of our life". The Chieftain staff has taken upon itself the task of re- 
cording one of the most fantastic years the class of 1977 will ever see. 
We hope that within the pages of this we have portrayed spirit as it 
was for the class of 1977. 

Greg Tyo 

Editor-in-Chief 1977 Chieftain 











Itim 



\im 



•££ 



.'*!*'• 






:J 



"If you can't lend a hand, 
then get out of the road, 
for the times, they are a'changing!" 
Bob Dylan from the '60' s! 







■ 



I A*.' 




MU 



■ 



I 




Yes, times are changing! Like it or not, 
without waiting for anyone's approval, things 
have been changing at K.P.; and the '77 staff 
has decided to get in step. In the past, year- 
books were divided up into 10 or more sec- 
tions with 10-20 section editors, all competing 
with each other for photos, pages and dead- 
lines. Everybody wanted the March 1st dead- 
line, of course; no volunteers for the Novem- 
ber 1st deadline! The first thing we did was 
reorganize the staff so we could put our effort 
into pulling together! The "hierarchy" became 
circular in design, rather than a ladder; no 
one was at the top. Special thanks to Shirley 
Uhl, who kept the wheel spinning, Kent Van 
Voorhis for showing us it could be done, Mrs. 
Sussan for all the money, Joe Simard for get- 
ting all those pictures to us on time for our 
deadlines, Tom O'Donnell for hanging in 
there, the whole faculty for saying "cheese", 
and last but not least, Roger Baugh (we know 
you're out there, Roger) for getting our book 

delivered on time . 



The Hardest Thing In 

Changing The Book 

Is Actually Changing It! 

In May 1976 the '77 Chieftain staff asked me 
to help them make their yearbook "their's". 
They wanted it to look different from previous 
year's publications; and especially they wanted 
it to reflect themselves in a more personal 
way. Sure! I told them I'll help you do that. 
What do you want me to do. Nothing, said 
Greg, we want to do it ourselves! I want ev- 
eryone to know that I've done a lot of nothing, 
and thats not easy to do! This book was con- 
ceived by the '77 yearbook staff and literally 
willed into being through the outstanding coop- 





\ 



Mis Takes $$$ Hd 



Jl 










H8HH 



erative effort of the entire staff. The '77 staff 
sees me as a tireless taskmaster, as I've 
been relentlessly after them to follow thru on 
their high standards and ideals . As it turns 
out, this is not "their" book, but "OUR 
BOOK", yours, mine, theirs -- everybody's; 
because we wanted this book to include every- 
thing that happened at K.P. this year, and that 
includes those of you who enjoyed the year 
with us, those of you who have already gradu- 
ated and those of you who have yet to arrive. 
I'm so happy to have been a part of this coop- 
erative effort. 








n\ Many mistakes 



Find? 



This year, for the first time, we 
are offering a prize for the person who 
finds the most mistakes in this years 
yearbook. This should not be difficult, 
because we've made plenty of them to 
help you out, so all you turkeys, get 
to work and see how bad it really is! 
Top prize is the King of the Roost 
Award, a real gobbler! (leftover from 
the chicken barbeque!) 



Chieftain Staff recommends 
a new word for dictionary 
slang - "DEADLINE!" 
Girard's theme - 
"There's a deadline a'comin, 
a'sprintin down the track. 
If you miss this deadline, 
runner, we'll all be on your 
back. Ah, I've got the 
deadline blues. " 






■ 



w 










■ 



US 



hm 



FORUM 




Left: Kevin Kelly glides into score his first goal. 



"Was that a goal?" 

-Pam Bryant 



Opposite Page , Above : Dave Holmes collides into 
Bob Bullock to prevent a goal . 



Lower Right: Dave McElwee takes a shot at the 
Senior goal. 




CARROLL'S BAIT & 
SPORTING GOODS 



^ 



Rt. 1A 



Norfolk, Mass 



shiners 
crawlers 

jumping worms , 
sea worms C 



Fresh & salt water tackle 
Boat and canoe rentals & sales 





Compliments 
of 

WRENTHAM 

HOUSE OF 

PIZZA 



DSC : ' I '*><&. » I ' KIBj tiro 




School Spirit was the objec- 
tive in November 1976 as the 
Senior Class challenged the 
Juniors to a grudge match 
hockey game . 

Though the affair took place 
at the totally ridiculous hour 
of 10:00 p.m. the battle drew 
quite a crowd of faithful 
K.P.ers. 

"What a joke" 

-D. McLaughling 



p 



Jr.-Snr. Hockey Game 



After an opening goal by the 
Juniors the score held more 
action than did the game as it 
tallied back and forth on the 
scoreboard. Few of the play- 
ers were of N.H.L. caliber 
and spent more time on their 
#?X*". than on their skates. 
This may have caused a few 
black and blues for the play- 
ers but it was hilarious to the 
thrillseeking crowd. 

The laughs began to subside 
as the wee hours of the night 
approached and the game 
neared it's end, the Jousting 
Juniors and Super Seniors 
found themselves locked in a 
tie. 



J pi r 



DAN POIRIER'S 
FLOOR COVERINGS 

LINOLEUM - CARPETS 




* FREE ESTIMATES 
*EXPERT 

INSTALLATION 

PHONE 695-3115 

117 South St. 
Plaineville, Md. 



For a moment it looked as 
if the game of the "game of 
the century" would end in a 
deadlock. But the Seniors de- 
termined to go home victori- 
ous , planned for a final attack 
on a stupendous play, the 
winning tally was scored by a 
real stupe . . . fabulous 
Frank Coles . 

The Seniors won the battle 
but everyone won the war as a 
great time was had by all . . 

By John Bernard 



Boq^en y 





PLUMBING - HEATING 

GAS FITTING 
COMMER.OAL- INDUSTRIAL. 

RESID^TI/VL- 



HOM£ 38f-83(ol 
605 668-935* 



21 LAKESIDE AVE". 
WRENTHAM 






road service 



complete line 
of auto repair 



DOUG'S TEXACO 



tel 384-8171 
339-5544 



East St. 

Wrentham, Ma. 
02093 










I'» 



I 






To My Son, Greg and his comrades 
Good luck in the big, competitive 
game -- called life 




CHEVROLET 
0L0SM0BILE 



L&B 





Arthur H. Meyer 



PRESIDENT 



L&B 

Cfievrolet-Oldsmobile 

26 FRANKLIN ST. 

WRENTHAM, MASS. 02093 
384-3000 



210 



I look at you 

Nothing can measure 

the great sadness I fell 

when I look at you 

I see a vastness 

which leaves me hollow . . . 

in uni's eyes I feel naked 

as a peeled orange 

adrift in the sea 

I feel a void of emmotion 

within me at times 

as if composed 

of pure logic and intellect 

I withdraw 

into deep thought of you 

I rejoice for you 
when you create beauty 
and love one another 

I pity for you 

and fear your destruction 

of one another , always . . . 

Nothing can measure 

the sorrow 

I contain within 

I am helpless with you 

I am helpless against you 

I feel empathy 

when I look at you 

and apathy 

when I look at myself 

Tragedy is the air we breathe 









We are fools 

to those who look at us 

We are mobile 

when we look at each other 

We are a farse 

for you are I 

I think of you 
a farse and a fool 
I look at you 
and I as fragile 
I look at you 
MAN. 








■ 



G. Turner 





211 






HMH 

mis 







King Philip, Students 






Six young men from K.P. 
participated in the Massachu- 
setts Special Olympics on 
June 12, 1976. Kevin Can- 
dage, Richard Turcott, Rus- 
sel Hassel, Ronny Berry, Bob 
Mylod and, Billy Bonnin all 
put in strong, and in some 
cases outstanding perfor- 
mances . 

The Special Olympics , 
which are sponsored by the 
Kennedy Foundation consists 
of a variety of running 




MILLER'S AUTO SALES 



DOUG MILLER JR. -SALES REP. 



TEL. 384-8171 
339-5544 



MILLER'S AUTO SALES 

USED CARS 

485 East St. Wrentham 

02093 




events, the softball throw, 
team basketball and swim- 
ming competitions . In the 
swimming events; Richard 
Turcott took first in both the 
fifty and twenty -five yard 
freestyles . Kevin Candage 
and Russel Hassel took a first 
in the relay . 

All the boys had been prac- 
ticing for weeks so by the 
morning of June 12 they were 
psyched, tremendously enthu- 
siastic and most important, 
ready. Richard Turcott who 
had been practicing extra in 
his backyard sped to an easy 
victory in both the fifty and 

Softball throw 



■J The 



Book of Wisdom 



^ 



I met a seer. 

He held in his hands 

The Book of Wisdom . 

" Sir , " 1 addressed him , 

1 'Let me read. ' ■ 

"Child-" he began. 

"Sir," I said, 

1 'Think not that I am a child, 

For already I know much 

Of that which you hold ; 

Aye, much. 



1 1 



He smiled. 

Then he opened the book 
And held it before me . 
Strange that 1 should have 
grown so 
suddenly blind . 
Stephen Crane 

Compliments of J . Uhl 





FOR DOLLARS LESS! 






Make Their Mark In The Olympics 



two -hundred and twenty yard 
dashes. Kevin Candage, al- 
though edged out of first in 
the fifty yard dash, put in a 
stupendous performance in 
the softball throw in his divi- 
sion. 

With a good effort in a 
chose race, Ronny Berry took 
a third in the fifty . Bob Mylod 
breezed to victory in the two- 
hundred and twenty yard 
sprint. All of these boys put 
in both excellent and enthusi- 
astic performances , and all 
of K.P. should be proud of 
them. 





RUSS' SERVICE 
CENTER 

(Cor Randall and South St) 

Wrentham 

tel. 384-7528 



\ 



Compliments of 
MERRY-GO- 
ROUND 

Plainville, Ma. 



\ 



Plainville Federal 
Credit Union 

117 A South St 
Plainville, Ma. 

Also Serving The Town Of 
Wrentham 

Life Insurance Protection 
Loan Protection Insurance 

All Accounts Insured To 
$40,000 NCUA 



>r 







"Play On Linda" 



Little do most K . P . ers know but we 
iave a very talented pianist among us , 
inda McCracken, who has competed in 
tate and national competions ! 

Linda says she can usually keep her 
:ool even in national competitions and 
ler record shows it. She went to and 
von the O . E . A . statewide talent show . 
7 rom there it was off to Topeka , Kansas 
"or the national competition . Up against 
;ome of the most talented young people 
ji the entire nation she was able to take 
dxth place ! 



Her success has come only with dedi- 
cated practice . She started playing at 
seven; "I really hated it then but my 
parents pushed me to continue it and I 
eventually came to love it . " Even 
though she is too advanced for lessons , 
she continues to practice an hour every 
day as she always has . But even prac - 
ticing is a pleasure to Linda; ■ 'It's in- 
vigorating . I just love to pound it 
out ! • ' How about becoming a concert 
pianist, Linda? "No I'd rather do 
something in medicine . ■ ' 



Best Wishes 

to the 
1977 Seniors 



NORFOLK POLICE DEPARTMENT 






Octo-lnstrumental Tricia 
Adams 



How many people can claim to own 
seven instruments and play eight? , not 
many but Tricia Adams can . 

What makes Tricia play all those in- 
struments ? " 1 just love music ; 1 love to 
entertain people and be entertained . ' ' 
An organ , a mandolin , a tenor sax , two 
clarinets , an accordian , and even bongo 
drums- -are all part of her collection of 
instruments . In addition , Tricia plays 
the guitar for a total of eight. As a lit- 
tle girl she loved to attend the Boston 



Pops' concerts, where she aquired quite 
an ear for music . She began at ten with 
the accordian and picked up the rest in 
quick succession . Now she plays any and 
all whenever she gets a chance . She 
plays the clarinet and sax, her favor- 
ites , in the band and the organ at spe - 
cial functions . 

Tricia is going to Annhurst College 
where she will be a classical music ma- 
jor: Her dream is to play, someday, in 
a symphony orchestra . 



214 




// 



Star On Ice 



// 



Among the students at King Phil- 
p, there is an outstanding skater -- 
4ary Norton . She is presently a 
nember of the skating organization 
-.ailed, ' 'The Tri- Valley Chips" , 
vhich operate out of the Norfolk are - 
1a. 

Mary has been skating ever since 
he age of six. After a few years she 
lecided to take lessons because she 
ibsolutely "loves" skating. So, she 
tarted taking lessons at the age of 
eleven. She generally skates between 
hree to five days a week. Her prac- 
ice schedule includes: one hour pri- 
vate lesson, one hour group lesson, 



and a practice of three to five hours a 
week without any instruction. 

In the past year, Mary has taken 
part in three competitions, in which 
she has been awarded silver medals in 
the last two . She has just passed her 
first figure 8's test and is now work- 
ing on her fifth and sixth free style 
award. She has also received ten out 
of ten USFSA skating awards . 

Mary's goal as a skater is to some- 
day compete in national competi- 
tions and if she doesn't qualify for 
the nationals, she plans to turn pro- 
fessional . . . 



Best "Wishes 
Class of '77 



WHITING AND DAVIS CO., INC 



NORFOLK 

COMMUNITY 

FEDERAL CREDIT 

UNION 

Norfolk, Mass. 02056 



(617)384-2431 

MORSE PAINT & 
SUPPLY CO. 

Hardware - Gifts - Plumbing 
Supplies 

Bob Whyte 

84 South Street 

Wrentham, MA. 02093 






Compliments 
of 

RAY'S 



215 



■ 



■ 




■ 



■ 

■ * 

I 



i 



** 



m 





Locomotion Circus 

One frosty December morn, 
a strange van pulled up in front 
of the gym lobby, a van bear- 
ing the words "Locomotion 
Circus" emblazoned on its 
side. 

The door slid open with a 
creek and from the van's mys- 
terious depths appeared two 
creatures; one tall and crazy 
and one short and crazy. 

Yes , the Locomotion Circus 
had hit King Philip. Those two 
zany practitioners of juggling, 



tumbling, unicycles, and mag- 
ic mesmerized King Philip au- 
diences for two shows . 

These two with the rather 
unlikely names of "Cyrus" and 
"Bounce", showed an astound- 
ing ability to crack RUDE 
jokes while tumbling and ca- 
reening through the air or 
while riding unicycles dressed 
in diapers . 

Seriously, much thanks to 
Cyrus and Bounce for a truly 
entertaining show. Hope to see 
them again. 

By Marvin Gardens 





Whole World Celebration 



In the fall of 1976, two 
busloads of foreign language 
students from K.P. attended 
the annual Whole World 
Celebration. There were ex- 
hibits from nearly every 
country in the world. Visi- 
tors could eat ethnic foods , 
folk dance , or buy gifts from 
all over the world. They 
could have talked with people 
from different backgrounds 
or just sit and relax to watch 
one of the shows put on by 
the ethnic or exotic dancers . 



Mrs. McNiel, Mr. Lan- 
ciaux and Mrs . Watkins 
chaperoned the excursion 
which had became an annual 
part of the foreign language 
year . Some of the things 
students came back with in- 
cluded full stomachs , tired 
feet, peacock feathers , ori- 
ental shoes, French crois- 
sants, hand-carved African 
figurines and paintings . 
Ma '/ students participated 
in folk dancing and some 
even in a magic show. 









A Celebrity In K.P.? 



So you don't remember a celebrity 
at King Philip? Well, if you consider 
someone performing all over Europe , 
Carnegie Hall , New York and 
Philadelphia Perm. , a celebrity then 
you had better think again. 

Senior, Gary Workman was the 
celebrity , at K . P . who accomplised 
these feats, during the summer of 
"76" "Skip" auditioned and was 
accepted as a trumpeter for 
1 'America Youth in Concert' ' . This 
group of young musicians were chosen 



for their musical ability to represent 
the United States as diplomats as well 
as musicians . 

Meeting many people through out 
the trip "Skip 1 ' decided that people , 
whatever their nationality were 
basically friendly. During the tour, 
which lasted a month , they visited 
London, England; Paris, France; 
Geneva, Switzerland; Imnsbrook, 
Austria ; Venice , Florence and 
Rome , Italy ; along with the two 
stops in the United States . 




y 




BE HONEST 

THINK POSITIVE 

BE COMPASSIONATE 

. TREAT OTHERS AS YOU WISH TO BE TREATED 
AND SUCCESS WILL BE YOURS! !!H 






BEST OF LUCK TO THE CLASS OF 1977 


m 

REALTOR* 


W. 


T. Galvin Jr. Co. Realtors 


Highest 

Standard of 

Professional Service 


14 Common St. 

WRENTHAM CENTER, MASS. 

384-3887 - 384-2232 

(24 HOURS) 



The King Philip teaching 
staff is continually improv- 
ing or updating its subject 
matter and professional 
background by taking advan- 
tage of the many courses and 
workshops offered in the 
area. Many of these have 
been held at the high school 
either after school or in the 
evening . 

This year many teaches 
from the area attended a 
workshop in the metric sys- 



tem . The workshop spon- 
sored by the Norfolk County 
Teachers Association was 
held in one of the new sci- 
ence room at the high 
school. The workshop was 
taught by Mr. Joseph Cor- 
mier, chairman of the sci- 
ence department and a met- 
ric instructor for both the 
Norfolk County Teachers 
Association and Leslie Col- 
lege. 



Metric Workshop 







I 
1 

I 
1 



■ 



r 



■ 

* V -; - 

Pro 




PLAINVILLE 
DRUGS, INC. 

Prescriptions 

122 South St. 
Plainville, MA. 

A. G. Nadeem 

E. Cordozo 

695-5091 



SO 



ol **tf*> ^ 



Kelly Blvd. 
North Attleboro 



Enjoy our Tr Y our 
delicious specialties 

Pizza 
Grinders Flavor-Crisp 
& Spaghetti Chicken 



For Faster Service 

Call: 

699-4449 

699-4440 




GUNLACH'S 
HOFBRAUHAUS 

Route 1A 

Plainville, MA. 

695-9053 




13 





With the end of construc- 
tion, reminding us of the 
opening of a new school, The 
Chieftain staff investigated 
other similarities and dif- 
ferences between now and 
the day K.P. High opened its 
doors . We spoke to the staff 
members who have been 
here from day One . We have 
14 such members: Mrs. 
Sherlock, Miss Manteca, 
Mrs. Pfeffer, Mr. Dwyer, 
Mr. Cosentino, Mr. Rob- 
bins, Mr. Hill, Mr. W. 
White, Mr. Tousignant, Mr. 
Morgan, Mr. Gallipeau, 
Mrs. Murphy, Mr. DiRe, 
and Mr. A. Hart. 

Their observations were 
varied: When the school first 
opened at the end of Septem- 
ber, 1957, the last things to 



be finished were the gym and 
the science rooms (sounds 
familiar, doesn't it?). Kids 
were kind of edgy that first 
year, for this was the first 
time the 3 towns had ever 
merged. As time went on, 
however, everyone became 
comfortable with each other . 

Observations were also 
made on styles of clothing. 
Mrs. Pfeffer (home-ec. 
sewing teacher) mentioned 
the girls were making an 
equal amount of pants and 
skirts now, when before only 
skirts and dresses were 
made . According to Mr . 
Hell, styles have returned 
somewhat to what they used 
to be like . Ties and blazer 
lapels are wide as they were 
years ago. 



When asked about changes 
in kids, some teachers said 
there was no real change at 
all, while others said that 
kids are more disrespectful 
now, of elders and of prop- 
erty. However, one teacher 
added that this is the trend 
of all kids in the country; 
our school isn't so unusual. 

Finally, we asked about 
changes in the teaching 
staff. "Everyone knew ev- 
eryone else back then. " said 
one teacher, "Now the 
school is so big. I don't see 
some of the teachers at 
all." Another teacher re- 
marked that, in this teach- 
er's opinion, that the staff 
has always been excellent 
but teachers have become 
more creative now. 



218 



rX»;, v ; 





Congratulations 

Seniors 

from the 

CLASS OF 78 



"Lively 
Latin" 

Far from being dead, Latin 
made a strong comeback this 
year attracting almost 25 
students . 

A few years ago it looked 
like Latin was going the 
same route of the buffalo, 
but this year Mrs . Negus 
managed to revive it. She 
went far to make the 
classes varied and interest- 
ing. On the three school 
days of Christmas week, the 
whole class sang Latin car- 
ols with the accompaniment 
of the accordians of Lars 
Arvidson and Linda 
McCracken, as well as Nan- 
cy Wilkinson's guitar. Stu- 
dents were so enthused that 
they memorized noun end- 
ings and sited them aloud 



If you can dream - and not make dreams your master; 

If you can think - and not make thoughts your aim; 
If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster 

And treat those two imposters just the same; 
If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue, 

Or walk with Kings - nor lose the common touch; 
If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you; 

If all men count with you , but none too much; 
If you can fill the unforgiving minute 

With sixty seconds' worth of distance run, 
Yours is the Earth and everything that's in it, 

And - which is more - you'll be a Man, my son! 

Rudyard Kipling 



KING PHILIP CHAPTER; NATIONAL HONOR 

SOCIETY 



whenever and wherever they 
got the chance ... on the 
bus, at practice, and even at 
the drive-in. Students claim 
Latin has drasticly improved 
their vocabulary and gram- 



mar . So next time you hear 
someone on the bus repeat- 
ing all sorts of strange 
words over and over again, 
they're not crazy, they're 
only Latin students . 



219 



'M; 



m 



s£ 



VV>. 



,'iV'f 



WBSk 



■ 



.**- 



F 



^ 



WRENTHAM COOPERATIVE 

BANK 
YOUR FAMILY FINANCE CENTER 



Mountaineers 

A group of 45 King Philip students 
spent their Columbus Day Homecoming 
Celebration 1976 on Mt. Manadonok 
N.H. 

The days journey for the 45 hiking in- 
tramural buffs began at 6 : 00 a . m . at 
the K.P. parking lot. Everybody arrived 
on time for the episode , everybody that 
is, except for one of the advisors . . . 
Mr. Murphy. After the three hour bus 
ride to the base , the reable band set out 
for the top. With Mr. Houde leading the 
way, the first hikers arrived at the sum- 
mit, around 11:00 a.m. , to find a sub- 
zero wind chill factor and lots of rock as 
the last stragglers made their way to 
their destination, the cluster of heavily 
cold hikers found crevices in which to 
eat lunch, after the seemingly endlessly 
ramble down , the bus set out for home . 
Arriving in Wrentham about 5 : 00 p.m. 
Arriving happy and satisfied after a fine 
day in the wilderness to a happy and 
satisfied High School . . . For the War- 
riors had defeated North in the Home- 
coming festivities ! Certainly a smash- 
ing day for the green + gold ... all 
over New England . 

By Pam Jelenik 




K.P/s Howard Cosell 

ABC may have Howard Cosell, but K.P. 
has Scott Butler. There's a new voice an- 
nouncing K.P. 's football results on WARA. 

Scott and his team of student spotters, all 
seniors, have been the first students to an- 
nounce and report the games . Sonds like 
fun but it's also work. In addition to 
MCing the games , he must take notes on 
all the action for future news reports . But 
he couldn't do both without his indispens- 
able team of spotters; Mike Heinz, Lars 
Arvidson, Paul Palmborg and Gerard Du- 
mas , who are quick to report on everything 
Scott might miss . After the game , he 
phones reports into the Globe , Herald , and 
the Call . He then writes and records a five 
minute report for WARA . 

Scott acquired the job as co- president of 
WKPH. While many might find the spot- 
light nerve -wrecking, Scott thoroughly 
enjoys it. He finds both public speaking 
and broadcasting exciting . What about 
those mistakes, Scott? "You say, "What 
the Hell' and don't worry' ' . 













Who are these sixty 




ceived an informative 


shifty -eyed charac- 




talk from the County 


ters being led into the 




Sheriff on the court 


courtroom by a stern- 


Cq 


system and then were 


eyed bailiff? Could it 


^k 


split into three groups 


be an infamous Chica- 


4/4 


to attend different 


go gang, or maybe a 


WL 


courtrooms. By popu- 


new batch of Water- 


I p^ 


lar concensus, the 


gate defendants? 


J|^l~ 


most interesting case 


Wrong! It is simply 


^m B \& 


was one involving ar- 


another one of Mr . 


^ B 


son near Wrentham's 


Mactaz's field trips to 


M ■ 


own Mirrow Lake . 


Dedham District 


I ^m 


The trip didn't end 


Courthouse. These 


m P^fepl 5k 


in Dedham, however 


dedicated individuals 


m K^^rW^. 


as the five busloads of 


sacrificed a whole day 


m m m m. 


students unloaded at 


of higher education to 


m m m ^. 


the door of the Sor- 


improve their knowl- 


m P m ^ 


rento II in Foxboro 


edge of the court sys- 


™ ^^^ ^ ^ 


for a fine Italian lunch 


tem. 


« ^ 


to top off the day . 


The students re- 


a. \ 






F* 


BEST WISHES TO THE CLASS OF 1977 


\ 








FROM THE 










KING PHILIP 










STUDENT COUNCIL 














■ 



m 



m 








*»« 



I 




■ 



■" . I 




Did you know .... 

That on Thanksgiving 
Eve a group of King Phil- 
x ips more juvenile delin- 
quents painted murals of 
Franklin High School . 
Yes , in keeping up with 
K . P . ' s newly acquired 
sense of spirit a number 
of youths painted "nas- 



A & J 

TOOL & FINDINGS CO. 

INC. 

6 West Bacon St. 
Plainville, Mass 02762 

Tel. 695-6631 or 695-5211 



ties" all over the front of 
the Franklin Field house. 

This , as you can imag- 
ine, aggravated the Pan- 
thers and to top if off we 
won the Turkey-Day 
game. 

No self-respecting high 
school could sit back with 
paint on their buns -espe- 



cially the notorious Pan- 
thers . The following night 
then, armed with brushes 
and house paint, the Pan- 
thers stalked their prey- 
but were caught! Now four 
hundred dollars in the 
hole, the Panthers learn 
that the only artists in the 
area are from King Philip . 




THOMAS H. CUDDY. JR. 



PLAINVILLE INSURANCE 
AGENCY, INC. 



119 SOUTH STREET 

PLAINVILLE. MASSACHUSETTS 02762 

TELEPHONE 695-3528 



222 



Congratulations to Janice 

Whitney, from Dr. Cohen 
Beanne, you're so damn 

immature 
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Arvidson 
Thumper, you taught me the 

meaning of love 
I love National Tree -week 
Be prepared to pay the price 

to make your dreams come 

true 
Life is beautiful with you, 

Bruce 
Think Architecture! Mr. 

Sumner, 
I'm going to make it! 

Thanks! 
Petunia, our love is unending 
Mrs . Eleanor Reed Alter 
A friend 
I see thru your sky, 

tomorrow 
Best wishes Susan- -Mr. and 

Mrs. Charles F. Williams 

Sr. 
Congratulations Susan- - 

Carol Lynn Williams 
Miss June Coutu 
"What's the scoop? "--the 

awesome threesome 
D, C,--and tuck 
Denise 
Good luck to K. P. #24-- 

Brother Bob 



Warmest Congratulations to 

Kathy--love, ma, Jim and 

Ed 
Gary F. Lombard 
Mr. Simarrian; K. P. Sports 
Mr. William A. Rice 
Mr. Brennan--U. S. History 

Teacher 
Mr. and Mrs. W. Lawrence 

McNeil 
Remember Junior Year '78 

P.C., L.C., K.C., K.W. 

natrons 



Congratulations to the class 

of '77 
Warm wishes for success in 

the future 
Genevieve Szczepaniak 
Good luck, Mugsi, love Bern 
Good luck, Meredith, love 

Aubrey and Jessica 
To Mugless, my favorite 

oldest sister, good luck 

always , love Weez 
Good luck Tami, love, Heidi 
Mr . and Mrs . Anthony J . 

DiRe 
Good luck Jean, from Sue B. 

& H. 
Good luck to all--Bink 



The Class of "80" is the 

best 
Ski Aspen- -you'll love it; 

really miss you Heather; 

Hello Car! 
Ms. Janna M. Bremer 
Mr . Alan White 
Sail on Seventy -Seven 
Good Luck: Class of '77 
Mr. Radziewicz 
Best of luck Gerard, love 

always, Linda 
Mr. W 
Mr. John Finase: Best of 

luck '77 
Mr . and Mrs . David Hoyle 
Best wishes to the class of 

•77 
Bern, Cin, Mer- -always 

remember "T" is for . . . 
Happy Anniversary Di (Jan. 

11th) 
The thorn will not ever be 

forgotten love the roses 76 
The very best to Lauren & 

Cathy 

Dr. Joseph 
Rothenstein 

Donald E. Fisher 
D.D.S. 



m 



I &t 



U* 






^m 



l^Ml 



■ 



^^H 



■ 



I f. 



I 







I 224 



DANCE ON, DIANA! 



"I love how the dance 
movements and the music 
seem to blend together. " 
These were the words of 
Diana Kenney as she de- 
scribed ballet dancing, a 
talent that Diana has a- 
chieved as a result of end- 
less practice. 

Diana's nine years of 
dedicated work have brought 
her some outstanding suc- 
cess. During the last three 
winters, she has won various 
parts in the professional 
production of "The Nutcrack- 
er Suite" in Boston. Also in 
May 1976, Diana appeared 
in another Boston product- 
ion, "Alice in Wonderland, " 
a play for which she spent 
several months in practice. 

Ballet wasn't always 
professional plays and ex- 
citement, especially when 
she first started in the third 
grade; "I really hated it. I 



cried and everything. " Now 
it is one of her greatest 
pleasures. 

"It takes everything out 
of you at the end of a lone- 
ly week of practice. " This 
is no understatement, as 
she spends eight hours (plus) 
a week on the dancing floor. 

Dianna plans to attend 
Adelphi University in New 
York as a dance major, but 
has not set all her eggs in 
one basket (keeping journ^ 
lism in the back of her 
for she knows the long/ 
road to success, and.&z< 
sional dancing certaiMy is 
a long hard road. 

However, with Diana's 
confidence and talent we 
may someday see a Marquis 
reading: 

"SWAN LAKE 

Starring Diana Kenn 





Telephone 528-1815 

ARVIDSON 
FLORIST 

Flowers for all 
occasions 

Flowers wired 
everywhere 

51 Main Street 

Norfolk, Mass. 02056 



28 MODERN LANES 



FICCO'S 
BOWLADROME, 

INC. 
AND COCKTAIL 

LOUNGE 

AL FICCO, PROP. 

EAST CENTRAL ST. 

FRANKLIN, MASS. 

TEL. 528-1142 



m 



MC 






^^Sl»* 



■ 



I 




poirlblPolliio day 



Seven students from King 
Philip attended the Art Eval- 
uation Day at the School of 
the Museum of fine arts in 
Boston. 

Tom Callahan, Tom Del 
Signore, Nancy Glowinske, 
Paul McAshill, Tom Ma- 
goney, Audrey Rastonis and 
Gary Turner were the K.P. 
artists present. 

Each of them had their 
portfolios evaluated by re- 
presentatives from such 
schools as The Pratt Insti- 



by N.G. 

tute; Brooklyn N.Y.; The 
Rhode Island School of de- 
sign, Parsons School of de- 
signs, New York city, Syr- 
acuse University and Massa- 
chusetts College of Art in 
Boston. 

The representative from 
each school would give each 
person an indication of their 
chance for admission in re- 
lation to their portfolio . 

Who knows a future Rem- 
brandt graduating from K.P. 



K.P. students were pleas- 
antly surprised one Febru- 
ary morning when a group of 
young musicians from the 
North-east Navy Band 
marched into the old gym to 
entertain the K.P. crowd. 

The band , clad in black 
pants and white Navy shirts 
played a cross -section of 
American popular music 
suitable to both students and 
faculty at K.P. 

Commencing with an in- 
strumental solo to wake and 




<S3 



(§Am©Ih(o)ff© (§M^®MM^ 



greet us, the midshipmen 
turned to some of todays 
memorable music. 

Singing and dancing to such 
tunes as "The Way We 
Were" and "I've got the Mu- 
sic In Me" was one member 
of the band, while another 
dedicated "I am Music" to 
all the females in the audi- 
ence. 

For the teachers came a 
series of songs from way 
back when, the 50' s which 
for some brought back 
memories of the high school 
days. 

During this period one de- 
lightful navy man went into 
the audience and sang 
"Sweet Sixteen" to her. 
That same wilty chap also 
sang the same tune to a 
member of the faculty who 
prefers to remain unnamed. 

They closed with their 
theme song "Anchors 
Awigh," and a final Thank - 
you to K.P. 

The overall effect was 
wonderful and successful 
this tune of "Led Zeppelin" 
and "Black Sabbath" the 
navy band was very popular 
at K.P. 




STANLEY 

INSURANCE 

AGENCY INC. 



Norfolk: 158 Main Street, 

Norfolk, Mass. 02056 

(617) 528-1454 

William J . Murphy 
Manager - Norfolk Office 

Home: 543-4621 



*"/ 



■ 



ft 



■ <.V! 






I 



*s v 



I 






- ^ 



I 



HI 

m I 



Pardon Me, Oh Waitress 



"Two blueberry pancakes coming 
right up" said the waitress at the 
Junior pancake breakfast, and 
things began to happen. 

The breakfast was staged on Sat- 
urday, January 22, 1977 from 7-11 
A.M. in the cafeteria. Junior Class 
advisor Mrs. Susan supervised the 
gala and it proved to be a tremen- 
dous success, (tremendous success 
financially that is, two customers 
died and one remains hospitalized 
with food poisoning.) 

The kitchen crew arrived at 6:00 
A.M. and the first casualty ... eh 
customer was seated at 7:00. He 
was served coffee for starters and 
finishers , . . no , no , he also enjoyed 



blueberry pancakes and sausages . 
Though he refused to touch seconds 
the kitchen crew smiled in delight 
as the gentleman raced from the 
cafeteria to tell others of the won- 
derful meal. 

Then the stoves were cranked up 
and pancakes were flying out of the 
pans faster than the customers 





could eat them, (actually they took 
quite long to cook but the customers 
weren't eating very fast.). Some 
were good and others bad, but re- 
gardless of their taste, everyone 
had a ball. 

When business slowed down, the 
workers found time to eat (in fact the 
workers had time to eat all morn- 
ing). 

Then came clean-up time, a time 
many found was time to go home . 
Those that remained helped Mrs . 
Williams , a cafeteria staff lady who 
had volunteered to help. As it 
turned out Mrs . Williams ended up 
doing more than helping; she did the 
whole pile of dishes while the so 
called "workers" took bets on what 
kind of detergent she used. 

After the event the class held a 
meeting and unanimously voted not 
to sponsor a Senior class breakfast. 

In all seriousness, the breakfast 
was a success; both for the class 
and for the customers . 



By 

N. O'Connell 



Congratulations 
Class of '77 

INEL KITCHENS 

560 Kelly Boulevard 
North Atheboro 
Massachusetts 



BEST OF LUCK 
from 



SPOTLESS CARPET CLEANING 
COMPANY 

Wrentham, Mass 



"Famous for our Deep STEAM 
Carpet Cleaning' 



rt t 



Seniors 

Adams, Patricia-88. 189. 190. 214. 

63 
Albert Jcanne-88. 188. 235. 203 
Alexander. Deana-88 
Allen, James-88 
Armilagc. Petcr-88 
Arvidson, Lars-88, 188. 184. 19, 

235 
Beauregard. Palricia-88 
Beaver, Craig-88 
Bedard, Armand-88. 86. 1 1 
Benkcr. Jill 89, 49 
Bergman, Anita-89, 160 
Bernard, John-89. 188. 18, 3. 14, 

235, 202 
Berry. Ronald- 89. 2 
Bilodeau. Donna-89 
Bilodeau. lrcne-89, 86 
Back. David J. -89 
Blasko. Dave- 1 54, 155. 5 
Bliss. Denms-89 
Blood, Eric-90 

Blood, Raymond-90,154,153.13 
Boissonneault, Craig-90 
Bonin. Maunce-90 
Bonneau, Jacklyn90 
Bouffard. Chrislinc-90 
Briggs. David-90.I54.155.I53, 4 
Brown, Eric-91. 154. 155, 232 
Brown, l.aurcnce-92 
Brush. Palncia-91. 188 
Bryant. Mcrrill9l 
Bryant. Pamela-91, 208, 18, 232 
Buchinski. Julie-91, 160. 162 
Buck. Lloyd-91 
Bullock. Robert-92. 209. 264 
Butler. Laurcn-92, 157. 184. 19, 

232 
Butler. Scott92. 156. 220. 82. II. 

13, 235 
Caiger, Bruce-92 
Callahan, Jackic-92 
Callahan. Thomas-92, 235 
Calzaretta, Ml iss92. 33 
Carchidi. Jcffrey-93. 154. 155, 4 
Carroll, John-93 
Carroll. Robm-93 
Carter. Niles-93 
Casey, Mary-22 
Cherry, Dianc-93 
Chruney. Jamcs-93 
Cindric. Colleen- 93 
Clinton. William-93 
Cobb, Susan-94 
Coghlan. Lca-94 
Coles. Frank-210. 216. 84, 232. 46. 

62 
Collctto, Andrea-94. 4. 8. 1 1 
Collcy. Hcalhcr-94, 188 
Collins, Karen -94 
Conncrs, Kathie-94, 62 
Conrad, Jennifer- 94. 232 
Cook, Barry-95 
Cook. Warrcn-95 

Cornell. Mary Ellen-32. 33. 232. 62 
Cox. Phyllis-95. 32, 232 
Curtin, Mary-95 
Daigle, Laurcnce-95 
Daniel. Robert-95 
Darling , Karen-95 
Darling. Timothy-96. 154, 34, 18, 

152, 153. 4. 5 
Davies, Joy-96 
Del Signore, Thomas-96, 3, 235. 

203 
Delory, Robin-96, 9 
Dcsrochers. Marcelle-96. 235 
Dicks, Marie-96 
Dicde. James-96 
Diminico, Janice-96, 
Dire, Mariannc-97. 87, 86. II. 232 



Doherty. David-97 

Donnelly, Laura-97. 2, 235 

Duffy. John-97 

Duffy. Joyce-97 

Dumas. Gerard-97, 156. 19. 3 

Dumas. Maria-97, 156. 157. 158. 

191, 190, II 
Dumont, Donald-97 
Duquette , Keith-98 
Duquette. Linda-98. 189, II 
Durant. Lisa-98 
Duvarncy. Elise- 98. 160, 155, 18. 

II, 1 60 
F.asterbrooks, Kathy-98 
hlh'-, Geoff-98 
Evans, Kathy-98 
bxarchos. Belsy-99 
Felix. Andrew-99 
Ferris. Linda-99. 232 « 
Finnegan. Slephan-99. 154. 155, 

184, 153, 4. 232 
Flower, Suzanne-99 
Fluck. Grctchen-99, 128, 190. 19 
Foley. Bonnie- 1 00 
Freitas. Richard-100 
Frink, Nancy-100. 22. 7. 9. 232 
Fortier. Carol- 100 
Fuller. Cynthis-100, 188. 235 
Fuller. MarjoriclOO 
Gagliarde. Janet- 100, 232 
Gagnon. Mary- 100. 68 
Gatie, Donna-101, 189. 66 
Geib, Mark F -191, 154. 155. 153. 4 
Getchcll. James- 101 
Gilchrist. Randy- 1 01, 14 
Glowinski, Nancy-101, 188, 68. 235. 

232 
Gross. Douglas 1 01 
Guay. Russcll-IOI, 154. 155, 152, 

153. 4 
Gomes. Laura- 101 
Gunlach, Dwight-102 
Guyot. Cheryl- 102 
Hargodon. Lawrence- 1 02. 232 
Hargreavcs, Joni- 102 
Harnois. Richard-102. 154. 155 
Harrison, Robert- 102, 154, 155, 4 
Harrop. Brenda-102 
Heinz. Robcrt-103. 154. 155. 232 
Hem, Susan-103 
Henderson, Jayne-103. 18, 22. 7, 

II. 232 
Hesterberg. Karl- 103 
Hoar.Kathlcen- 103. 68 
Hokanson, Alan-103 
Holda, Stacie-103. 188 
Holmes, Fred- 104 
Hughes, Glenn-104 
Humphrey, Chris- 1 04 
Jaworski, Kim C-104. 232 
Jelinck. Joyce-104 
Jensen, Kirk- 1 04 
Jones. Donna- 104. 189. 86. 62 
Jostin, Stephen- 1 05, 56 
Kelley, Patricia- 105 
Kelly, Donna- 105 
Kelly, Kevin-105 208. 210, 235. 

264 
Kelly. Mary-105. 22, 7, 9, 232 
Kelly. William-105, 232 
Kenerson. Kathleen 205 
Kenney, Diana- 105, 235 
Kenney, Jay- 106 
Kinlin. Clark-191, 35, 19. 22, 87. 

86, 7. 9, 14. 235, 232. 264 
Kirby. James P-106, 154. 155. 153 
Koch. Craig- 1 06 
Kohut, Dori-106. 8. I I 
Kunz, Sandra- 106, 86, 232 
Lach, Donna- 106 
Lamb, Jeanine-107, 232 
Lanbert, Ann-Marie-107. 189, 190. 

3, 13, 235, 232, 202 
Lanagan, Stanley- 1 07 



Landry, Charlene-107 

Larkin, Paul 1 07 

Larochcllc, Martha-107 

Larson. Nils- 107 

Lewicki, Patricia- 108. 232 

Linkous. Debroah-108 

Loughlin, Catherine- 108. 160. 62 

Lyons, Michael- 1 3 

MacAdam, Cheryl-108, 9. 61 

MacKinnon, Jean-108 

Maduskuie, Patricia- 108 

Maguire, Keith-108 

Mailhot, Angelina- 108 

Marcelino, Paul-109. 210. 54. 155. 

216, 35. 22, 153, 232, 46 
Marcin, Joseph-209 
Martin. Andrew-209, 176, 44 
Martin. George-109 
Marriett. Diane-209, 62 
Mattingly, Jeffrey- 1 09 
Maurit7, Virginia-209 
Mcbrien, Liam-109, 13 
Mccoy, Cathie- 1 110, 188, 189. II, 

23: 

Mcdonncll, James- 1 10 
Mcdowell, Brien-109 
McElwee. Dalel 10, 264 
Mcintyre, Maureen-110 
McKay. Pauline-110, 189 
McKeown, Michael- 1 1 
McLaughlin. Dennis-110. 156, 176. 

178, 6. 235 
McVane, Micheal-lll. 176. 232 
Meyer, Gregory-Ill, 176, 154, 155, 

178, 152. 210 
Milton, HollyAnnc- 11 I 
Mitchell, Kevin-Ill. 154. 216, 34, 

18. 86. 232 
Moore. Timothy- 1 1 1 
Moran, David- 1 1 I 
Moran, Joanne- 1 1 1 
Mucciarone, Paul- 1 12 
Mullen, Deborah-112 
Murphy, Mary- I 12 
Nason, Tamie-1 12 
Nevins. Wendy- 1 12 
Noble. Todd- 112, 191 
Norton, Bonnie- 1 12 
O'Brien. Diane- 1 1 2, 28 
Palmborg, Paul- 1 13. 156, 157. 158 
Patriquin, Brian- 1 13 
Peebles, Karen -113, 68, 232 
Perry, Janice- 113, 39 
Pezold. Dorothy- 1 13. 160. 81. 173. 

174 
Phclan. Susan- 1 13. 232 
Picini, John-1 13 
Pimemtal, David- 1 14 
Pink, William-1 14 
Pitt, Karen-I 14 
Plante. Georgia- 114, 190 
Poiricr, James-114, 156 
Pond, Donald- 114 
Pond. Howard-114 
Pope, Linda- 1 15 
Potter, Timothy- 1 15 
Powderly, Kent- 115. 13 
Prevett. Susan- 1 15 
Rastonis, Audrey 1 1 5 
Ray. Christopher- II 5. 154, 153,4 
Ray, Nancy- 1 15 
Reid. Carrolyn-116, 188 
Robillard, Greg -116 
Robitaille, Mark-116 
Robitaille, Maurice- 191 
Robitaille, Peter- 1 16 
Rogers, Jane-1 16 
Roy, Michael-116 
Rubel, Karen- 116, 8, II 
Russel, Dunkan-1 17 
Sachs, Chris- 1 17 
Santandreu, Steve- 117, 156, 135 
Schnorbus, Richard- 13 
Schreiber, Robertll7 



Sciaba, Paula- 117, 81, 2, 86, II 

Sewarl, Scott- 1 17 

Shivers, Paula- 1 17 

Shruhan, Gail-117 

Smith, David-118 

Smith, Gary-118 

Smith, Wayne-118 

Snow, Donna- 118, 160, 173 

Sodaquist, Raymond- 1 18- 156 

Sousa, Robert-118 

Spraggue, Donna-119 

Starkey, Craig- 1 19, 176. 179. 35. 

87, 86. 232 
Steinbauer, Merridith-1 19, 87- 86- 

235, 232 
Stewart, Kathaleen-1 19, 160 
Stockman, Michael- 119 
Sullivan. Ronald- 119, 176 
Sweeney. Linda- 1 1 9 
Tedesco, Patricia- 120, 2 
Tennyson, Susan- 1 21 
Thibault. Gary- 1 20 
Thompson, Beth- 120 
Thompson, Michael- 120 
Thompson, Patricia- 120 
Tobin, Kathaleen-120 
Tomeo, Philip- 120. 84 
Trahan, Paula- 121, 188, 3, 235, 

232, 203 
Tronti, Annette-1 21 
Turner, Gary-121, 235, 202 
Tyo, Gregory- 3. 235. 232. 203 
Tyo. Stephen- 1 21 
Tzizik, Seth-121, 184, 35, 86. 13. 6. 

12, 205 
Uhl, Shirley 121, 190, 3, 235 
Urko, Allen- 121, 176, 154, 155, 

179, 153, 4, 235, 232 
Usher, Shane- 122 
Vanvoorhis, Kent- 1 22. 156, 188. 

158, 3, 235 
Villemaire. Daniel- 1 22, 156. 2. 6 
Villemaire. Donald- 1 22. 156. 2 
Wade, Kern- 122, 188, 10 
Waitkevich, Barbara- 1 22 
Walker Louis- 122 
Walker, Scott- 123, 199 
Walls, Thomas- 123 
Wardener. Donna- 123 
Weaver. Robert- 123 
Weise, Karen- 1 23, 188, 68 
Whitmarsh, Judy-123 
Whitmarsh, Linda- 123 
Whitney, Janice- 124. 68, 237 
Widak. Sherry-124. 188, 18, 16. 10. 

232, 46 
Williams, Susan- 124, 14 
Wolfgang, Robert- 124 
Wood, Carolyn- 1 24, 235 
Workman, Gary- 124. 217, 11. 14 
Wright. Jan- 124 
Zagieboylo, Cynthia-124. 18. 33. 17. 

235, 232 



Juniors 



Albert, William - 126 
Amoling. Kristina - 126, 191, 31 
Anderson, Eileen - 126 
Anderson, Scott -- 126 
Armstrong, Kim - 126. 61 
Atkins, John - 126 
Auclair, James - 1 26 
Bailey, Scott - 126. 155, 152 
Barnes, Kristan -- 126 
Barrett, Michael - 126 
Barstow, Roger - 126 
Bedard, Andrew — 126 
Belcher, Melanie - 126, 30, 13 
Bernard, Richard - 126 
Betts, Kenneth - 126, 135 
Beyersdorfer, Jack - 126 



Billingsley, Brad - 126 

Bilodeau, Michael - 126, 29 

Binney, Bruce - 126 

Bissanti. Mark -- 126 

Bitel, Michael - 126, 10 

Bixby, Douglas - 1 26. 66 

Bjorkman, Vincent - 126. 235 

Black, Michael - 126, 63 

Blood, Eric - 1 26 

Bonollo, Thomas -- I 26 

Boucher, lames - 126, 155 

Bourque, Suzanne -- 126 

Boyden. Lisa -126. 3, 235 

Branagan, Donald - 126 

Bremilst. Nancy - 126 

Bronsdon, Scott - 126, 136 155 

Brosnan, Rita -- 126. 160, 173, 172 

Brothers, Jill - 126 

Brown, Deborah -- 126. 173 

Brown, Diane - 126. 160, 184, 47 

Bryant, Jeanne -- 126 

Buck, Jeff - 1 26 

Bullock, Kelly - 126 

Burlingame, Walter - 126 

Byrne, Robert - 126 

Callahan, Margaret - 126. 34, 171 

Candage, Kevin - 213, 212 

Cartier, Albert -190 

t ashman, Diane - 126, 26, 27 

Christensen, Donald -- 136 

Chruney, John - 154, 126, 26 

Chutjian, Lisa - 235 

Give, Bonnie -- 47 

Colletto, Henry - 188. 5 

Corsi, Kathleen -- 126. 157. 173. 

174. 172 
Costa, Patricia - 162, 13, 235 
Crawford, Meredith - 126. 31, 125 
Daskiewicz, John -- 136 
Dean. Carlton - 29 
Dean, Stephen - 155. 190 
Downing, Denis - 127 
Dumont, Robert - 135. 127 
DuPonte, Brenda - 171 
DuVarney. Theodore - 188 
Easterbrooks, Kelly -128 
Eichin, Kevin -- 182. 63 
lllis, Joyce - 128. 160. 173, 174 
Embree. Paul -- 155, 126. 153 
Ericson. Deborah — 128 
Ericson, Renee - 128, 169, 63 
Evans. Carl - 135, 188. 184, 5 
Farrar, Cynthia - 128 
Fearnley, Susan - 128 
Feid, Dale - 128 
Field, Denise - 126. 128. 26, 7 
Fish, Charles -- 128, 190 
Fiske, David - 128, 136 
Fitzgerald, James - 128, 176 
Flannery. Jack - 135. 77 
Flynn, Kathleen - 128 
Frizzell, Frederick - 1 28 
Fuery, Joan - 126, 128 
Gagliard, Thomas - 135 
Galvin, Stephen - 128. 191, 190. 32 
Gatie, Larry - 128 
Gauthier, Wayne - 128 
Geromini, Robert - 128. 155. 35. 

20. 152, 125 
Getty, Peter -- 63 
Gilson. Paul -- 128 
Gomes, Diannc — 128 
Grady, Richard - 126, 128 
Guenthner, Mark - 128. 10 
Hagopian. George - 128 
Hamlin. Kevin - 128 
Harmon. Lori - 173 
Harrington, William - 128 
Harrison, Gala -- 128 
Hartley, Shawn - 128, 159, 5 
Hartley, Tricia - 126, 128, 125 
Hayden, Susanne - 126, 129 
Hayes, Shawn - 136, 159 
Healy, Mark - 129 



229 



■ 




I . . ;* ■ ** 



■ 



■ 



1H 




Hemmingson, Harold -- 129 
Hcwiu. William - 12') 
Hicks. Joel -136 
Guisli, Di, uK- l 28 
Guisli. Ralph - 128 
Herbert, Nona - 129 
Henderson, J ■- 129 
Hokanson, Debra •- I 29 
Hollcnback. Dorcen ■- 129 
Holmes. David -- 128. I5S 
Holmes, Roberi •• I 29 
Hoyle, David -129 
Hume, Scon -- I -4 
larossi, Joseph •- 129 

ion, Philip -■ I 2') 
Jaworski, Pamela -- I 29 
Johnston, David -- 129 
Johnston, Steven -- 129 
Keller, Paul -- 136 
Kelly. Kathleen - 129 
Kelly, Martha -- 129. 235 
Kelly. Theresa - 41 
Kcnncy. Lisa -- 126. 129. 184 
Kettcll. Gar> - I 36 
Konowitz, Craig -- 1 29 
korslund. Jeff-- 135 
Lapierre, Kimberlj - 129 
Lapointe. Laurence -- 129 
Lawless. Jacqueline -- 129 
Lawrence. Bernadcttc - 129, 188, 

189. 32. 13, 235 
Lawrence, Darlene -- 126, 129. 13. 

23? 
Legge, Robb - 135 
Lewicki, Mary -- 129. 232 
Linton, Nancy -0 45, 129. 160 
Looncy, James - I 54, 7 
Loring, Janet -- I 2') 
Loughlin. Thomas - 12(>. 129 
I umnah, Richard -- 1 29 
Mac Askill, Paul - 129 
Mackie, David -- 124. 28 
MacKinnon, Lorraine - 129 
Mahoney, Thomas - 129, 155 
Ma.lhol, David - 135. 89. 184 
Marcurc. Jeanne - 129 
Martin. Thomas - 129, 188, 5 
Mathews. David - 135, 155 
Mathys, Beth - 27 
Mccabe, Susan -- 129 
McCarthy, Linda - 129 
McCracken, I inda - 126. 129, 235, 

214 
McLlwcc. David - 129. 209 
McLanc. Linda - 129 
McMahon. Janet - 129 
Mcmorrow. James - 126. 129 
McNulty. Susan -126. 129 
McVane. David - 129 
Melin, Diane -- 129. 26, 235 
Mensel, Macy - 129 
McGlocklin -- 144 
Merrill. Richard - 130 
Mezzadri, Mark — 130 
Mitchell. Susan - 130 
Moeckel, Karl -- 130 
Moriarty. Jody -- 130 
Morriscau. James - 130 
Morse. Lori -130. 47 
Mowatt, Paul - 130 
Mullaney, Joan - 190. 84 
Murphy. John - 130 
Mylod, Cheryl -- 130 
Neal, Mark - 130, 190. 13 
Newell. Donald - 130 
Newell. Eileen - 130. 191 
Newell. Kim - 130 
Nichols. Mark -136 
Nisil, Mary - 130 
Norton. Robert - 130 
ODonncll. Karen - 130 
OConnell. Boinc - 130. 30. 4. 235, 

61 
OConnell, William - 135 



Odams. Robert - 130. 155, 164 
Padden, Diana - 130 
Palmborg, David - 130 
Partington, Kim -- 130 
Pass. Candj -128 
Payne. Patti - 130 
Pcllelicr. Sandra - 126, 130. 150 
Perron, Nancy - 130, 1X4 
Perry. Alan - 130. 155 
Petruchik, Dwight - 130 
Piantedusi, Nicholas -- 130. 
Plummer. Nan - 130. 160, 173 
Poirier. Michael -130. 155. 1-1 
Poisson, C hcryl - 130. 88. 2. 41 
Porter. Patricia -- I 30 
Pothier. Janice - 1 50,45 
Pothier. Steven -- I 26 
Powderly . Monica -- I 30 

nor -- I 30 
Rapoza, Thomas- 130. 176 
Ravinski, Diane - 126. 1 10 
Ravinski. Kenneth - 136 
Reardon, John -- I 30 
Ribero. Leslie - 130, 67 
Ricci, Lance -- I 36 
Roche. Edward - 130 
Rose. John - 126. 130. 176. 1-4. 

34 
Rose. Russell - 130 
Ryan, Patricia -130 
Pond, M ~ 138 
Sabatini. John - 126. 130. 27 
Santoro. Bernard - 130 
Scholtes, Mark - 130 
Schreibcr, Lee Anne - 131 
Scoff, Cheryl - 131 
Sepe, Anthony - 131. 190 
Shanks. Darlene - I 3! 
Shepherd, James -- 126. 131 
Shruhan, James -- I 31 
. I homas -- 1 31 
Simmons, lames -128 
Smith. Bradley - 131, 156 
Smith, Sheila - 131 
Soule, Steven -- I 35 

Sous. i. Cynthia - 1 31 
Southern, David -- I 31 
St. Pierre, Julianne -- I 31 
Standing. Johathon - 131 
Stevens. Martha -- 131 
Stockwell, Scott -- 126. 131 
Stodart. Robin - 126. 131 
Swallow, I eslic -- 131 
Swanson, Donna -- 131 
Sweed, Gary - 131, 155 
Swenson. Carolyn -- 131 
Thenault. Donna -- 131 
Thenault. Gregg - 131 
Thibeau. James - 1 31 
Thibeault. Monica -- 131 
Tomes. Kenneth - 184. 47 
Trcen, Cynthia -- 140 
Trewcck. William - 131. 177. 188 
Tumavicus, Constance -131 
I ndcrhill. Sarah - 131 
Usher, Toni - 131 
Vallcly, Vincent -- 131 
Vaughn, Susan - 126. 131, 189 
Wadleigh . Edith - 126. 131. 189 
Waitkcvitch. Diane -131 
Y\ aldron. Martin - 131 
Walker. Bruce - 131 
Wallace. David - 136 
VN.ilk Charles - 131 
Warnick, Karl - 135 
Waters, Thomas - 131 
Watremez, Rcnee -131, 26, 235 
Weber. John - 131 
Wichland, James -131 
Y\ iese, Michael -- 131 
Wilfret, Pamela - 131 
Williams, Lee -- 131 
Williams, Lynnc -- 131. 4 
Wilson, James - 189. 128 



Winter. John - 154 

Wisnewski. Deborah -- 131 

Wood, David - 1 36 

Woodhams, < arol - 131, 160. 173 

Woodhams, Cathy - 131. 160. 162. 

123 
Woolford. Donald - 131. 135 
Workman. Denise -- 131 
Zasadny, Philip - Ml 

Sophomores 

Agustinelli, Domenic ■ 132 
Amidon, Karen -- I 32, 161 
Amoling. Richard - 132. 133 
Andrews. Mary - 132 
Antonitis. Daniel - I 32 
Arena. Gregory -- 1 '2 
Babcock. Jeffcry - 132 
Baker. Llaine - 132. 133 
Bambbery, Timothy - 132. 47 
Banks. Chrestopher - 132 
Barnes. Mark -- I 32 
Barney, Robert -- 132 
Barstow, Leonard - I '2 
Bassignani. Paul 
Batalon, Deborah - 132. 133 
Bnedetti. Andrew - 133. 189. I'll). 

84 
Benker. Sharon - 132. 62 
Bent. Thomas -- 132. 55 
Bernard, Denise -- I 32 
Bernardine, Nancy 
Best, Carl - 132, 190 
Bishop. Judith - 132 
Blair. Burt - 132 
Blasko, Richard - 134 
Bouffard. Kathleen - 132 
Brady. Daniel - 132 
Bray, Jennefer - 132. 131 
Brown. Karen - 133, 161). 14 
Brule. Kathleen 
Bryant. Dave - 13 1. -6 
Bullock, Lorraine -133 
Burke, Cheryl - 133 
Butler, Brian - 133. 235 
Cacciapaglia. Patricia - 133 
Candcla. James - I 34 
Carroll. James - I 33 
Charest. Linda -- I 33 
Chmiclinski, Paula -- 133. 61 
Cole, Phillip - 133, 161 
Coleman, Mark -- I 33 
Collins, Gary - 133 
Connelly, Kevin - 133 
Cook. Cindy - 133. 137. 26. 27 
Cook. Michael - 133 
Cooper. Deri - I 33 
Cope, Cheryl - 133 
Bunten. Deborah - 132 
Colwin B. - 142 
Cormier, Barbara -- 133 
Cornell. Rebecca -- 133 
Cronin, Barbara - 13.3 
Crosby. Meredith - 133. 1 17 
Curlin, Michael -- 133 
Cushman, Paul -- 46 
Dahlbeck. Cindy - 133 
Dalolto. Donna - 133. 62 
Darling. Carolyn - 133 
David. Robert - I 34 
Davics. James - 133, 154 
Desrochers. Daniel -- 134 
Desrochcrs, John -134 
Diamond, Peter -- 1 34 
Dias, Brian - 134 
Dion, Roberta - 45, 134 
Dire, Bcrnadetta - 132, 133, 137 
Dolan, Karen - 134, 154 
Dolan, Leannc -- 134, 161 
Donnelly. William - 133. 1 14 
Doolcy. Katherinc -134 



Dumas, Mary -- 134. 158. 157 

Duronle. Jeffrey -134 

Duquette. Gary - 134. 156, 159 

Duquette. Joanne -- I 34 

Dyer. Brenda - 128. 134. 84 

Dyer. Chris -134 

1 den. Christopher -- 134. 235 

Edwards. Leslie -133. 137. 184. 161 

Edwards, Stephen - 1.34. 156. 158. 

2 
Lichin. Donna -- 1 34 
I limn, Bruce - 134 
Ipstcin. I on -- 134. 84 
I rickson, Keith - 135 
Ivans. Paul - 5, 135 
Farquharson, Gary - 135 
Feeney, Thomas -- 135 
ferns, Landon - 133, 134. 232 
Finnegan, Robert - 134. 176.154. 

IS. 4 
fisher, David -I 13, 135 
Fisher, I aurie -- 135. 190, 32. 157 
I lanerly. David - 135 
I lannery. Donna - 1 35 
1 Ivnn, Eileen - 1 35 
Flynn, Paul - 135 
Flynn. Susan - 132. 133. 137 
Fountain, Albert - I 35 
I rcitas. Tammy -- I 35 
Fuller. Kristin -204 
Gabriel, Aaron - 135 
Gallerani -- 135 
(lately . Debra - 135 
Getchell, Paula - 135 
Gilboy, Donald -135 
Gleason, Kevin -- 135 
Gomes, Lorna - I 35, 84 
Grady, Debbie - 12s 
Grady Joseph - I 35 
Granger, Peggy - I 35 
Greer, Nancy -- I 35 
Grotte, Kimball - 135 
Guenthner, Donna -- 125 
Haehnel, Constance - 135 
Hagopian, Mark -- 1 35 
Hall, Dale - 136 
Hanlon, Laura -■ I 36, 158, 190, 

I'll. 11. 157, 62 
llassell, Russell -143 
Hauer, Vivian - 128. S4 
Heinz, Hohn - 133, 134. 154 
Hergt. William - 136 
Herzog, Christine -- 1 36 
Higgins, William -- I 36 
Hill. Marsia - 136 
Holda. Katnna - 133, 136. 188 
Holmes. Barbara - 1 16 
Holmes. Deborah - 136. 84 
llolske. William - 136 
Hoyle. Wayne - 136 
larossi, Genevieve -- 136 
Jaworski, Jennifer -- 133, 136, 157. 

62 
Jelinek. Pamela - 136. 188. 4. 235, 

203 
Jensen. Kendra -- I 36 
Johnson, Joseph - 177, 136, 179 
Johnston, Dianna 1 16 
Jones, Robert - 133, 136, 154 
Jordan, James -- 39, 136 
Karlsson, Linda -- I 36 
Kclley, Cynthia - 45. 136 
Kelly. Patricia - 136 
Kelly. Suzanne - 136. 133. 189 
Kennedy. George -- 134. 154 
Kinlin. Bruce -133. 136 
I acourse. Michelle -- 136 
Lamb, Joanne -137 
Lanagan, Laurie - 137 
Lapierre, Roy -- 137 
Laruchcllc, Linda - 137 
l.arsen. David - 55, 137 
Lasky, Joann - 137 
Lcblanc.Katherine - 137 



Legge, Diane -- I 37 

Leonard. Gay - I 37 

Leonard. Paul -I 37 

1 ess. Barbara -- 1 37 

l.cveronc, Robert -- 134. 154 

Lacourse, Lisa - I 36 

Lewicki. John - 133. 134. 34 

l.inclon. Michael - 137 

Long, Sally - 137 

Long. Thrcncc -- 137 

Lopes. Michael -- I 37 

Lorusso. John -- I 37 

Loughlin, Steven -- 137 

Lumnah. Marie -I 37 

Luongo. Denise -- 137 

Luongo. Diane -- I 37 

Lynch. Barbara - 1 37 

Lynch. Edward -- I 37 

Macaione. Donna - I 37 

Maedonald. David - 137 

Mackey. Jonathan - 137 

Maguire, Kenneth - 137 

Mandoni. Linda -138. 84 

Manganiello. Joseph -- 138 

Manning, Mare -47 

Marchand, Laurel -- 138 

Mavrides. Melanic -- 133. 137. 138 

McCullough. Thomas - 138 

Mckay, David - 138 

Mckay. Valeric -- 138 

Mckeown. Patricia - 138. 160. 173. 

172 
Mclanc. Randall - 138 
Mentation, John - 138 
Mcgna. Mary - 138 
Merrill. Robert - 138 
Miller. Care - 138 
Miller, Mary Lou - 138 
Miner, Marianne -1 IX 
Morriscau. Lisa -- 1 38 
Mowatt, Donna - I 38 
Muliero, Robert - 1 IX 
Mullaney. Maureen - 128. 138. 

1X9. 190, 84. 63 
Mulligan. Russell - 138 
Murray. James -- 138. 154 
Nason. Heidi - 1.37 
Nevins. Deborah - 133. 138 
Norton. Mary - 138. 215 
Odoardi, Christine - 138 
Oloughlin, Colleen -138 
Olson. Carla - 49 
Oneil. Francis - 138 
Padula. Brenda - 138 
Palmer. Lisa - 133. 128 
Parker. Steven - 1 38 
Patton. Donald - 138, 39 
Pcncolo. Robert -138 
Perron. Raymond - 138 
Petrovick. Michael -138 
Petruchik. Beth - 138. 184. 152 
Pfieffcr. Matthew - 138. 57 
Phelan. Michael - 138 

Picueill, Shiralee -- 1 38 
Picrpont, Eugene - 139 
Pittman, Rollins -- 139 
Porter, David - 139 
Pothier. Gregg - 139 
Power - 139, 190. 21 
Molloy. Matthew -- 139 
Prcvctt. Lois - 13.3. 139 
Pritchard, James -- 139 
Ragucci. John - 139, 154 
Ray Thomas - 139 
Ribero. Cheryl - 133. 137 
Rignanese. Diana -- I 39 
Ringuctlc. Robert -- 139 
Robillard. Tracy - 139 
Rogers. Tina - 139 
Rooney. Paul - 139 
Ross. Thomas - 133. 134. 154 
Sajdak, Stuart - 139 
Sanborn. Mary - 128. 139 
Santandrcu, Paul - 139 



□ 



230 




#r i 



Schnorbus. I ynettC - I 19 
Schreibncr. Laurel - 139, I ft I 
Sciaba, Pamela - I 39 
Sepc, Chris - 139, ft3 
Sewart, Gilbert -140, 154 
Shade. David -- I »9 
Shilo. Heid. - 139, 160 
Shruhan. Linda -- 139 
Shufcll. Russell - 139 
Simmer. Gerald •• I 39 
Smith. Carol -- 139 
Quinlask. W - 139 
Smith. Cynthia - 133. 139 
Smith. Jane -I 39 
Smith, Pamela •- 133, 139 
Soulc. David -■ 133, 
Southern. Brenda ■- I 39 
Spencer. Scott 139 
St Pierre. W irren •- 140 
Statkewice, Irene 1 40 
Steinbauer, Aubrey -• 1 It. 
Slock, Robert ■• 134, 154. JS, }4 
Stockman. Kathleen -• 133, 140. 

1X8. 173 
Stoti. Carol - 140 
Sulham. Shernlaine 140 
Tcdcschi. Judith •• 140 
Tennyson . Mark ■- 140 
Then. lull. Gary ■ ' 4I) 
Thiscdcau Kevin ■• 140. 154 
Thompson. Kevin - 17ft 
Thompson. Richard -• 14ft 
Thompson. Steven -- 134. 17 
Thurston. Paul - 140 
Tomes, Kevin - 209. 140 
1 umavicus, Ann -■ 140 
Vallely. Sallie -- 140 
Vnins. Bdgar •- 110 
Waitdevich. Paltie - 140 
W.iikcr. Jud> - 140 
Walker. Todd -140 
W arnick. Eric ■■ 140 
Warren, Stuart -140 
W assinus. Bruce I 40 

Weaver, David -- 140 

-. Donald ■- 140 
Webber. Laura - 140 
Webster, Mark -- 133, 134, 154 
Wcdgcwood. Charles ■- 140 
Wen/el. Vicki - 133. 137. 35. Iftl 
Wcrning. Kristin - 140 
Wichland, Susan •- 133, 140 
Wilkinson. Nancy -- 137 
Willard. Wanda -• 133, I '7 
Wood, Chris -140 
Wooding. Theodore - 140 
Wright. Cheryl - 140 
Zaccardi, lames - 1 40 
/agieboylo. Stephen- 133, 140 
Zcigler, Margaret •- 140 



Freshman 



Albert. Robert - 142 
Niger. Richard - 142 
Ml.ird. Cath) - 142 
\midon, James -- 142, 177 
Amoling, Susan - 141. 142 
Andrews. Richard - 142 
Andrews. Theresa -- 142 
Anlonilis, Lorctta -- 142 
Armitage. Brian - 142. 154 
Armstrong, 1 y nda - 142 
Atkins. Kenneth -- 142 
Bain, Henry - 142 
Ballard, Robin - 142 
Barn. Sheila - 132 
Barstow, Charles -- 142 
Bcdard. Alan - 142 
Bcnker. John -142 
Bcrnardini. Joan -- 142 
Bc/cma, Martin -- 142 



Bibby. ( hcryl - 142. 235 
Bilodeau, Caroline -- 142 
Bishop. John - 154 
Bite). Dcbra - 142 
liiorkmen. Keith - 142. 58 
Boissonneault, Jeff -- 142 
Boulter. David - 142. 154 
Bowie. Laurie -- 142 
Brosnan. Anne -142, Iftl. 172 
Brothers. Theodore - 142 
Brvant. Cardie A. - 142 
Burke. Carolyn J. - 142 
Burke. Teresa J - 128, 161 
Butler. Bruce S. - 142. 158, 157 
Butler. Claire E - 142. 158. 157 
Byrne, Michael P. - 13 
Byrnes. ( hervl A -- 142 
Callahan, Michael V - 141 
Calleaux, David N - 14- 
( armody, John J. -- 142 
( harron, David M - 142 
Chmielinski, Donald -- 142 
Chuljian, Mark A -- 142 
Cindric, Joanne- 142 
Clark. Debbie A - 133 
( lark. Valerie J -■ 142. 141 
( loutier. lohn M - 142, 154 
( ody, Diana I - 142 

142. 173 
( onbon, Lorraine M -- 142 
( ook, I riderick S -- 142 

,ii ( ■- I 42. I 54 

( opeland, Robin \ 

l orsi, Mark - 142. 1 -ft. 159 
( osentino. Beth -- 142 
( ronin. Nanc) J -- I 28 
( romn. Herbert S. - 142 
Daigle, Vdrienne \ 142. 191 
Daniel. ( arl E -- 142 
Daniel. Christopher D -- 142 
Darling. Wayne \ - 142. 128 
Darling. Wendy A - 142 
Daszkiewicz, Thomas -- 142 
Dav ies, .lav < -- 14' 
Dclorcv. Bruce J -- 14 t 
Demcrs. lames M - -14 t 
Dervan, Deborah -- 143 
Devlin. Patty \ -- 143 
Diamond. Maria J -- 
Dias. (ilenn r - 134, 154 
Dire. I ouise M ■■ 141. 143 
Dobo, Joyce I ■ 143 
Drolctle. R - 143 
Dufrcsnc. Jcanmaric -- 143 
Dumont. Carol A - 143 
Donnelly. P - 191 
Durham. Laura -- 143 
Duvarney, Christopher - 143 
I His. Steven -- 143 
Embree, Diane - 143, 171 
Enegren, I van - 143 
I pperlv. Mice -I 34 
I arquharson, Jean -- 143 
Ferland. I ynnc - 143 
I erns. Daniel -- 143 
I innegan, Mary - 143 
Lishcr, Patricia -- I 43 
Flannery, ames -- 143. l 54 
Llynn, Paul - 143 
I rench. Nancy - 143 
I uller. Jeanne -- 143 
(iagliard. Donna -- 143 
(ianimian. Jaren -143 
Gauthier, Amy -- 143 
Geib, Cynthia - 143. |90, 19. 1 1. 

173 
(ieorgia. 1 isa -- 143. 173 
Gcrmaine. Joseph -- 177 
Gifford. Bret - 143. 15ft. 157. 177. 

159. 156 
Grady. Mary - 143. 161 
Graves. Raymond -- 143 
Green. Kerry - 143 
(ireer. Joanne - 143 



Gronroos, Lisa -- 128 
Grubc. Grctchcn - 143. 157 
Guay. Jeffrey -143 
Gundlach. Glen -- 143 
HacHncl. Anne - 143 
Hamlin. Brian - 143 
Hancock. Ronald - 143 
Hanlon. William - 143. 156. 157, 

158. 190. 63 
Haraldscn, Kurt -- 143 
Harrington, Kathleen - 143 
Harrison, Timothy - 143. 177. 154. 

152 
Healy, David - 143 
Heffelfinger. Dirk - 143 
Hcmmingsen, Debbie -- 143 
Hemmingscn. Donna - 143 
Hendry. Suellen - 143. 161 
Hicks. Russell -- 143 
Hill, Sarah - 143, 154. 171 
Hill. Steven - 143 
Hochberg. Susan -- 141 
Holmes. Janet -- 144 
Holt. Cheryl - 144 

i Stephen -- 144. 177 
Hughes. Richard -- 144 
Hutchins, Jean 144 
Jelinek. I illian -- 144. 141 
Jillson, Scott -- 144 
Jillison. William - 143 
Johnson. Derek -144 
Johnslom. Victoria -- 144 
Jollimorc, John - 1 44 
Kaine. Sheila - 144. 161 
Kelleher, John -144, 154 
Keller. Barbara -- 144 
Kelly. Stacey -- 144. 190 
Kcnerson, Richard -- 144 
Jclincau. J - 144 
Kenncy. Tina - 144 
Killion, James -- 144 
Knight, Deborah - 144 
Knyff, Aart -144 
Korslund. Scott -144 
Kuphal. Belinda - 141 
LaRochclle. Paul - 144 
Lalumid. Maura -- 141. 144 
Lang , Grctchcn -161 
Larkin. Joseph -- 144 
1 arscn, John -- 144 
Leary, Kathleen --I44 
I eblanc, Denise - 144 
Leonard. Thomas -- 144 
Lcuthold. Helane, ■- 144, 1X4 
Lewicki, Frederick -- 144. 154. 232 
Lewin. Mark - 144 
I cwis. Richard - 144. 177. 1-4 
Lindsay. Richard - 137. 190. 63 
Ludwig, Karen - 144 
Lyons. Edward -- 144 
Macaione, Diane -144 
MacDonald. Brenda - 144. 173 
Pauline. MacDonald - 144 
Mackie. Ruth - 144 
Long, G. - 144 
MacKinnon. James - 144 
Macphee, Paul -- 144 
Mailhol, Doreen -- 144 
Manning, Joseph -- 144, 154, 159 
Manning. Kirk -- 144 
Marcin, Stephen - 144. 154 
Marcinkevicius. Charles -- 144 
Marcurc, Dennis - 144 
Marriett. Albert - 144 
Marshall. Sandy -- 144 
Mccullough. Teresa - 144 
Mccusker, Dennis -- 144, 177, 154 
McKay . Joey -- 144 
Mclcish, David -- 144 
McVane. Brian - 144. 177 
Maxon, Peter -- 144 
Meyer. Scott - 144 
Miller, Carolyn -- 145 
Miller. Susan -141, 145. 170 









Moeckel. Peter - 145 


Simmons, Charles -■ 146 




Morel. Donna -145 


Singer, David -- 146 




Monarty. Kevin -- 145 


si iney, Paul - 146 




Morley. Stephen - 145 


Smith. Charles -146 




Morris, James -- 145 


Snow, Gary -- 146. 154 




Morriseau, Joseph - 14s 


Soderquist. Brian -- 146. 156 




Morse. Charles ■- 145, 154 


Sousa. Thomas -- 146 




Movsessian, Cheryl -- 14s 


Spraguc. Linda -- 146 




Murphy. Darlenc -- 145 


Standing, Daryl -- 146 




Murphy. Kelley -- 145 


Starefos. Peter -146 




Murray. Johathan - 14s 


Stenquisl. Lori -- 146 




Nelson. Karen - 145 


Stevens. Lucy - 146. 46 




Nelson, L.niris -- 1 38 


Stewart. Patricia - 146 




Newell, Debra - 141 


Siockwcll. Todd -- 146 




Nichols. William -145 


Stewart. K - 160 




Norton, Jody - 145 


Stodart, C raig -- 146 




Noyes, Andrew -- 145 


Stott. Howard - 146 




O'Connell. Denise - 14s 


St Pierre, Rene - 146 




OConnor, Colleen - 14- 


Sulham, Dcatra 




Odoardi. Gary -- 145 


Tamburine, Vincent -- 146 




Owen. Charles - 145 


Thibauk, Michael - 146 




Owens. David -- 145. 1-6. 157. 159 


Thibcaull. Denise -- 173 




Palmer. Carolyn -- 145 


Thibediau. Harold -10 




Parker. Steven -- 145 


Thompson. Steven -- 146 




Miller, Mark - 145 


Tobin, Edward - 146. 177 




Meyer, 1 - 144 


Tobin. James -- 140 




Parmenter. lee - 145 


1 olatovicz, Shern -- 146 




Pass. Mary - 145 


Tomco. W'ndy -- 146 




Patur70 , Matthew -- 145 


Topham, Charles - 14<> 




Paul, Mary - 145 


Trewcek. Robert - 146 




Paul. Nancy Jean - 145 


Troni. Paul -- 146 




Paul. Suzanne -- 145 


Tyo, Kevin - 141, 146 




Pelletier, Paul - 145 


Tzizik. Joel - 140, 146 




Perron. Marcelle - 145 


Vilbig, Richard - 140 




Perry. Caroline -- 145 


Villcmarie, Charles -- 146. 1 -ft 




Piculell, Antone -- 145 


Vincent. Robin - 146 




Pierce, Karen -- 145 


Vinson, Leonard -- 146 




Pierpont. Richard -- 138 


Vitins.Rita - 146 




Pikarsky, Debbie - 145 


Waitkevich, Mark -146. 177 




Plante. Charles - 145 


Waitkevich, Sandra -146. 173 




Podell. Wayne - 145 


Waldron, Timothy - 146. 154 




Poiner. Joel -- 145. 177, 159, 156 


Wallace, Robert - 146 




Poisson, Corinne -- 145 


Walls, John - 146 




Polhier, Kevin -- 145 


Wardner, David - 140, 177 




Prantis, Richard - 145 


Waits, Judith - 146 




Prevett. Deborah - 145 


Welsh. Ellyn - 146, 61 




Pntchard. Dori - 14- 


Welsh, Howard - 146 




Piece. L - 145 


W'erning, Wendy - 146 




Rammel. Trisha -- 145 


White, Susan - 146. 173 




Rapoza. Timothy — 145 


Whitmarsh, Nancy -- 146 




Rastonis. Vilija - 145 


Whyte. Deborah -146, 161 




Ravinski, Maureen -- 128 


Woodhams, Charles - 146. 191 




Ravinski, Robert -- 145. 1 -4 


Woods. Jeffrey - 1 46 




Ray, Robert - 154 


Woodward. Charles - 146. 190. 84 




Reid, Susan -- 139 


Woodworth, Frederic -- 146 




Ricci. Tina - 145. 184 


White. L. - 140 




Richards, l.orcn -145. 159. 157 






Lmaldi. James -- 145 






Ring, Gary - 145, 139 






Rinquette. William - 145 






Roberts. Gregg - 145, 141 






Rose. Cynthia -- 145 






Rose. Mitchell - 145, 154 






Rose, Sarah -- 145 






Rowell, Rhonda - 146 






Roy, Gary -146 






Roy. Richard - 146 






Rubel. Theodore -- 146 






Rubyck , Diana -- 146 






Ruhl. Gary - 146 






Russell. Robin - 141. 161 






Sabatini. Kathleen - 146. 141. 173 






Saccardo, Linda -- 146 






Salamone. Paul - 146, 154. 44. 55, 






54 






Santucci, Paul — 146 






Savior. Dawn - 146 






Scott, Laura -- 146 






Rosa. Richard - 145 






Shaw, Michael -- 146. 154 






Shruhan. Darlene -- 146 






Eileen, Shruhan - 146, 157 






Shruhan, Elaine -- 146 






Shruhan, Jacqueline - 139 




231 



1 / ■ 





■ 






■ 



WRENTHAM 
INSURANCE 

88 South St. 
Wrentham, Mass 
02093 




Donkey 
Feathers 

In a game that could split a 
donkeys hair the faculty edged the 
seniors out in K.P. craziest bas- 
ketball game . The game was 
packed with rowdie action be- 
tween men as well as donkey's. 

Capacity crowds roared it's ap- 
proval as the two dy- no -mite 
teams squared off. The super sen- 
iors fielded : Clark Kinlin , John 
Bernard, Ron Sullivan, Wayne 
Smith, Joe Marcin, Stover Guay, 
Joyce Jelinek and Duffy, Donna 
Spragg, Mary Curtain, Elise Du- 
Vanarney, Laura Donnely, Keith 
Duquette , Armand Bedard , Nancy 
Frnk and Janet Gagliardie . The 
brave teachers were , Mr . Rice , 
White, Sheehan, Keimack, Fink, 
Matarie , McCourt and their only 
woman, Miss Fink. 




Congratulations to Sue 
and the class of 1977 

J & L ELECTRIC 



7 Holbrook St. Norfolk, Mass. 

Leo V. Prevett, Prop. 

528-1354 



FUTURE TEACHERS 

OF 

AMERICA 

Wish the class 

of 1977 success 

and happiness 



232 






EHQ 




BO-PEEP 
MKTS. 

120 South Street 

Plainville, Mass 

02762 




First half quickly both teams 
rang up high scores in fast action . 
The crowd's got rowdier as the 
action picked up. Mighty Mutar- 
ie's tackling made for alot of body 
contact. By halftime the teachers 
were four points aheaded. 

There was some crazy halftime 
action to keep the crowd enter- 
tained . A dollar bill was placed in 
the center and the seniors charged 
out of donkeys attempting pick up 
the bucks . In the end only John 




Thanks From the Class of 77 
We owe it to our spirit, so rowdy and so fun 
We owe it to our craziness it made us number one. 
We owe it to ourselves, we each had a helping hand. 
In creating the greatest class which now we must 
disband . 

And next year when they comeback, 

to the building where we've been, 

They'll wonder where the spirit went 

and will come back again. 

They'll wonder where the excitement went, 

so alive and full of cheer. 

That was bubbling all through the school, 

each day throughout last year. 

And they will remember 

When they look at what we've done, 

That all the class of 77 did, 

Was work hard and have fun . 

No one can forget us 

no matter how they try 

for the Class of 77 

It's spirit will never die. 

The Class of 77 would like to 
give special thanks to our 
advisors for their hard work 
and support: 

Mr. Keimach 

Mr. Sumner 

Miss Krol 
Thank -You 

CLASS OF 77 



Getting On With The Donkeys 



Bernard and Joyce Jelinek tri- 
umphed . 
Charged action between the 




teams and their DONKEYS domi- 
nated the second half . In third 
quarter the seniors surged ahead 
despite some uncooperative 
mules. Interseptions by Mary Cur- 
tain, Elise DuVaurney, Joyce Je- 
linek helped the super seniors 
surge ahead. Much time was tug- 
ging and pushing stubborn mules . 
But the seniors hoped to dash in 
the fourth quarter. Super star Mr. 
Rice captured the ball five times 
to rack up ten points ! Not to be 
out done the dynomite combo of 
Nute Sullivan and John Bernard 
banged up ten points. But, in last 
minute effort, the teachers scored 
another basket making the final 
score 28-26. There were plenty of 
sore asses but no sore feelings. 




233 





■ 



i. 



■ 






■ 



I 






I 






"K.P.'s Flying Ace" 

Its a wonderful sense of 
freedom, like getting away 
from everything" 

That is how Dianne Waitke- 
vich describes her "natural" 
high, airplane flying. 

Flying has been an important 
part of Dianne' s life since 
February 1975 when she start- 
ed. Her father, a pilot, intro- 
duced her to the subject and 
she decided that flying was de- 
finately something she wanted 
to do. 

Her first solo came in Au- 
gust 1976 — Friday the thir- 
teenth. Of that feat she said "I 
was more nervous when I 
came back down and realized 
what I had just done" . 

She hopes to have her pilots 
liscence by April 1977, but she 
first must achieve several oth- 
er goals including long dis- 
tance flying, night flying and 
emergency flying. It has taken 
a lot of work but she says 
"He's a great sense of accom- 
plishment and something that 
is unique among most girls my 
age. 



Roller Derby Stars 



Diane thinks flying will be 
more than just a leisure time 
activity for her. As a future 
business women she feels 
flying will come in quite 
handy . 

While most American High 
School students spent their 
Tuesday nights in the winter of 
76' -77' watching "Happy 
Days" and M.A.S.H. , K.P. 
students were out rolling 
around town. 

That's right!! Intramural 
roller skating hit King Philip's 
scene and the response from 
students was tremendous . The 
evening consisted of two fun 
filled hours of rolling for- 
wards , backwards , and around 
that never-ending rink in Nor- 
wood. 

The intramural roller skat- 
ing program rolled along under 
the supervision of several 
Roller Derby stars , among 
them: Miss Woo Woo Watre- 
mez, Mrs. Knockout Sussan, 
Mr. Gawk-at Glowinski, and 
Mr . Slow poke Sumner . Even 



the bus drivers were found 
rolling around the rink with the 
kids. 

There were three classes of 
skaters in the King Philip clan. 
First could be found the "beg- 
ginners", those skaters who 
looked like new born calfs beg- 
ginning to walk. Next could be 
found the "Intermediates". 
These were the skaters with 
the fatest ego's on the rink. 
They thought they were ready 
for the pros until an expert, 
(the third class of skaters), a 
rare sight in the K.P. crowd, 
would slide by to crush the fa- 
tened ego of the Intermediate . 

Still one class of skaters re- 
mained; The "bruisers". This 
class exists between the beg- 
ginners and the intermediate . 
These skaters had skated pre- 
viously but had still not mas- 
tered the all important art of 
staying on their FEET. 

AL1 in all, it was a fun time 
for all the skaters and certain- 
ly healthier than "Happy 
Days", pop corn and soda. 



PIONEER ENGINE CO. 



Best Wishes to the 



Class of 1977 









Credits 



Co-Section 
Editors 

Cyndi Zagieboylo 

Gymnastics 
Cindy Fuller 

Forum 

Undergrads 
Diane Melin 

Girls Basketball 
Steve Santandreu 

Happenings 
Kevin Kelly 

Hockey 
Dennis McLaughlin 

Boys Basketball 
Diana Kenney 

Forum 
Lisa Chutjian 

Field Hockey 

Forum 
Pam Jelinek 

Index 

Baby photos 

Writers 

Dennis McLaughlan 
John Bernard 
Pam Jelinek 
Nadine O'Connell 
Diane Melin 
Kent Van Vhooris 
Shirley Uhl 
Jeanne Albert 
Cindy Fuller 
Carolyn Wood 
Nancy Glowinski 
Lars Arvidson 
Martha Kelly 
Bernadette Lawrence 
Darlene Lawrence 
Linda McCraken 
Laura Webber 
Paula Trahan 
Greg Tyo 
Cyndi Zagiebol 
Cyndi Zagieboylo 
Lisa Chutjian 
Pat Costa 
Brian Butler 
Scott Butler 



Cathy Lauglar 
Ann Marie Lambert 
Clark Kinlin 
Laura Donnelly 

Art 

Diane Melin 
Nancy Glowinski 
Tom DelS ignore 
Steve Johnston 
Merideth Steinbaur 
Tom Callhan 
Diana Kenny 
a friend 

Vincent Bjorkman 
Cheryl Bibby 
Darlene Lawrence 
Chris D 
Chris Eden 
Gary Turner 

Business Staff 

Lisa Boyden 
Brian Butler 
Rene Watremez 

Photography 

S. Uhl 

Loring Studios 

L.D. 

T. D. Brown 

Mr. Sumner 

Alan Urko 



for the caligraphy over our 
senior photos 

for the work she did raising 
money for the Chieftain 

for the use of some of their 
articles in our Forum Section 



Special Thanks to 

Miss Newell 
Lisa Boyden 

The Rational 
Indian 

To Ms. Katherine 

Podgers 

Time, 

indespensable 

knowledge, 

dedication and 

FUSTRATION 



■yet 



I 



(Oh 



H 






BET'S 
COFFEE SHOP 

158 Main St. 
Norfolk, 

Mass. 



■ 






■ 

■ i 



■ 






,4^ 






I 



HS 



w. 



T. HOLMES CO., 
INC. 




Best Wishes to the 
Class of 1977 









An instrument for hicks? 
No way, says Nancy Wilkin- 
son who is a serious and 
dedicated banjo player. 

Nancy started strummin in 
1972 when her cousin 
psyched her out with some 
pretty fantastic playing. 
Ever since then she's been 
picking the strings a half 
hour a day. In addition she 
plays six kinds of guitars , 
the harmonica and the man- 



dolin ("I'm terrible at it!). 
But why the banjo? "You can 
let yourself come through in 
your music. It's mostly an 
ad-lib instrument so the 
more creative you are the 
better it will sound", says 
Nancy. She even makes ex- 
tra bucks playing at local 
clubs . Despite her talent she 
has no professional plans 
because she feels the field is 
too crowded. 



m 



■ 



CB — HAM — MARINE GEAR 



SALE and SERVICE 

COMMUNICATION 

SHACK 

Wrentham, Massachusetts 

384-7578 

HOME & CAR RADIOS — STEREOS & TV 

WALK IN SERVICE 




Janice Whitney may be 
King Philip's most unique 
student since she is our only 
Scottish dancer. 

Ever since she was six 
years old, Janice has been 
working to achieve perfec- 
tion in her dancing . Through 
a difficult but graceful set of 
steps and moves , Janice 
tells a story from Scottish 
history. Being a recognized 
and regulated sport, it holds 




Congratulations 
to the Class of 1977 



MCCRACKEN'S AUTOMOTIVE 
SERVICE, INC. 



107 Spring St. 
West Roxbury, Ma. 02132 



// 



One In 20,000! 



n 



K. VanVhooris 



competitions around the 
world. Janice has won over 
one hundred medals and tro- 
phies in contests from Cali- 
fornia to Canada. This sum- 
mer she will be traveling to 
world championship in Scot- 
land! Her success has come 
only through practicing an 
hour a day with four hours of 
lessons a week. 

Janice admits she's a bit of 
a "dance freak". To why 



she's so crazy about Scottish 
dancing, she answers, "I 
love the work. I just love to 
perform . I literally eat up 
applause." She plans to con- 
tinue her dancing at Oklaho- 
ma University where she 
will be a pharmacy major 
next year. After school she 
figures she'll hang up her 
shoes and stick to teaching. 









rspu 



mm 









■ 



irai 



HB 

F 







■ 




' 



BABY PHOTO 
Page 50 

1. Mike McVane 

2. Kevin Mitchell 

3. Susan Phelan 

4. Karen Peebles 

5. Alan Urko 

6. Nancy Glowinski 

7. Bobby Heinz 

8. Jayne Henderson 

9. Pam Bryant 

10. Mary Kelly 

11. Billy Kelly 

12. Jennifer Conrad 

13. Ann -Marie Lambert 

14. Steven Finnigan 

15. Marrianne Dire 

16. Janet Gagliard 

17. Eric Brown 

18. Clark Kinlin 



BABY PHOTO 
Page 51 



1. 

2. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 



18. 
19. 



Nancy Frink 

Lauren Butler 

Cyndi Zagieboylo 

Greg Tyo 

Larry Haradan 

Sherry Widak 

Phyllis Cox 

Cathy McCoy 

Mary Ellen Cornell 

Frank Coles 

Sandy Kunz 

Marcelle Derosiers 

Meredith Steinbauer 

Kim Jaworski 

Paula Trahan 

Jeanine Lamb 

Tricia Lewicki, Linda Ferris, 

Matt Ferris, Fred Lewicki, 

Mary Lewicki 

Craig Starkey 

Paul Marcelino 




Credits 



Co-Section Editors Art 



Cyndi Zagieboylo 

Gymnastics 
Cindy Fuller 

Forum 

Undergrads 
Diane Melin 

Girls Basketball 
Steve Santandreu 

Happenings 
Kevin Kelly 

Hockey 
Dennis McLaughlin 

Boys Basketball 
Diana Kenney 

Forum 
Lisa Chutjian 

Field Hockey 

Forum 
Pam Jelinek 

Index 

Baby photos 

Writers 

Dennis McLaughlan 
John Bernard 
Pam Jelinek 
Nadine O'Connell 
Diane Melin 
Kent Van Vhooris 
Shirley Uhl 
Jeanne Albert 
Cindy Fuller 
Carolyn Wood 
Nancy Glowinski 
Lars Arvidson 
Martha Kelly 
Bernadette Lawrence 
Darlene Lawrence 
Linda McCraken 
Laura Webber 
Paula Trahan 
Greg Tyo 
Cyndi Zagieboylo 
Lisa Chutjian 
Pat Costa 
Brian Butler 
Scott Butler 
Cathy Lauglar 
Ann Marie Lambert 
Clark Kinlin 
Laura Donnelly 



Diane Melin 
Nancy Glowinski 
Tom DelSignore 
Steve Johnston 
Merideth Steinbauer 
Tom Callhan 
Diana Kenny 
a friend 

Vincent Bjorkman 
Cheryl Bibby 
Darlene Lawrence 
Chris Eden 
Gary Turner 

Business Staff 

Lisa Boyden 
Brian Butler 
Rene Watremez 



Photography 

S. Uhl 

Loring Studios 
T. D. Brown 
Mr. Sumner 
Alan Urko 



Special Thanks To 



Miss Newell 

for the caligraphy over our 

senior photos 
Lisa Boyden 
for the work she did raising 

money for the Chieftain 
The Rational Indian 
for the use of some of their 

articles in our Forum Section 



Arnold Macktaz, lovingly known as 
"Arnie" to his friends, was a member of 
the Social Studies Department for 8 years 
at King Philip. Everyone, the admini- 
stration, fellow members of the Faculty, 
and students, have expressed their loss 
and admiration for him. His death on 
February 21, was a loss to us all. 

HIS TEACHING WAS LIFE TO HIM 

Yes, Arnie, I do believe Mr. Poulos saw 
you truly 

For you had relinquished every other as- 
pect of your life 

These past two years, and settled finally 
down to daring death 

To stop you, if it could. Meanwhile, 
you just kept on 

Meeting your students, having discus- 
sions with them; 

Teaching them to seek the truth, daring 
them to think; 

Challenging them to argue for what they 
thought was right. 

Then you would smile, your quiet, spe- 
cial, twisted little smile, 

And you'd walk on, down the corridor, 
swinging that bag. 

Days that you were absent we would 

watch for your return, 
I would pray for you; but never met your 

eyes with any but a lightsome smile. 
Well I recall the day that you refused to 

drive me 
To the school, when my Chewy broke 

down. "I don't drive 
Safely any more, " You said. "So I 
. won't risk driving you. " 
Yet you risked your own life daily, 

just to teach your class. 
That was more than courage, Arnie. 

That was love and devotion 
To your students, to your class. . for 

Connie had it right, 
I do believe, when he defined it: 

"His teaching was his life to him. " 
And fbrevermore, Arnie, your teaching 

has been built in to 
Them, and they are filled with your rich 

store of knowledge, 
Inquiry, love of justice, and a flaming 

search for truth. 
No, Arnie, that kind of living never 

dies. 
It is a flame that burns to lighten all 

our lives! 













■ 



•v/« 






1 




HELVE 






r 




1 1 ■ ■», 



as, ? viTMS 




KHnhI 



H 



■ 






■ 



U§ 




. 



EHKS 



■ 



H9I 







1 




i > 'AH 

1 ;»'a*3wj 






nI